Showing posts with label 115th OH INF. Show all posts
Showing posts with label 115th OH INF. Show all posts

Tuesday, October 6, 2020

Official Reports of the Campaign in North Alabama and Middle Tennessee, November 14, 1864 — January 23, 1865: No. 190. — Report of Col. Lewis Johnson, Forty-fourth U. S. Colored Troops, of operations December 2-3, 1864.

No. 190.

Report of Col. Lewis Johnson, Forty-fourth U. S. Colored Troops,
of operations December 2-3, 1864.

HDQRS. FORTY-FOURTH U.S. COLORED INFANTRY,         
Nashville, Tenn., December 4, 1864.

LIEUTENANT: I have the honor to submit the following report of the affair which occurred on the 2d and 3d instant, at Stockade No. 2, on Mill Creek (Chattanooga and Nashville Railroad), between the troops temporarily under my command and the enemy under General Forrest:

At 8 a.m. the train containing the Forty-fourth U.S. Colored Infantry and Companies A and D of the Fourteenth U.S. Colored Infantry left Murfreesborough and arrived at the bridge over Mill Creek, guarded by Block-house No. 2, at about 11 a.m., when suddenly a battery opened upon the train, nearly all of which was upon the trestle bridge. The locomotive and first car were struck and several of the men injured. I immediately got my command off the train and moved it up to the stockade, which I supposed was evacuated, but, on my arrival there, found it occupied by a detachment of the One hundred and fifteenth Ohio Volunteers, commanded by Lieutenant Harter. As the block-house was full, and three batteries were shelling us terribly, and a heavy musketry fire commenced from all sides, I formed my men around the house and then pushed a portion up a hill on the east side of the fort, which entirely commanded it, and from where the heaviest fire was kept up. Unable to carry the crest of the hill I kept the men on the side of it, and had logs and stumps of trees converted into a breast-work. This position afforded them much shelter, and they held it against several assaults of the enemy. The batteries, which continued their fire, injured the block house constantly; they had to change position a dozen times, being silenced by our musketry. At about 5 p.m. the enemy managed to establish a battery on the hill of which I spoke above, and it was this battery which did more harm than all the rest. It knocked the lookout of the stockade to pieces, and also the roof, which caved in at several places. The shots fired by it struck the house every time, and a number penetrated it; one shell, exploding inside, killed the railroad conductor, who had sought shelter in the house, and wounded several of the garrison. It was now dark and the artillery fire ceased, but musketry was still kept up. I drew the command back to the block-house, and left a strong skirmish line at the position which we had occupied during the day. As my ammunition was nearly exhausted (the men who came off the train only had forty rounds), and I expected an assault, I stopped all firing in order to reserve the tour rounds I had left per man for the last effort. The firing was kept up until 3 a.m. of the 3d, but not answered by my men. My position was quite desperate, and when I took into consideration that my stock of ammunition was almost expended, the stockade so much used up that a few shots would have knocked it down, and having lost one-third of the men, I resolved to abandon the stockade and fight my way to Nashville. I knew that should the place be surrendered or taken by assault a butchery would follow, and I also knew that re-enforcements would have been sent to me if it had been possible to send them. I therefore left the block-house at 3.30 a.m., and, contrary to my expectations, got through the rebel lines without much trouble. I arrived at Nashville about daylight.

In addition to the above I have to state that I left Surg J. T. Strong, Forty-fourth U.S. Colored Infantry, and Chaplain Railsback, Forty-fourth U.S. Colored Infantry, in the block-house to take care of the wounded men.

The soldiers and officers of the different commands behaved well and steady during the entire fight, and especially during the retreat; every man did his duty; not a shot was fired, but silently they marched, determined to die rather than be taken prisoners.

The forces engaged numbered as follows: Forty-fourth U.S. Colored Infantry, 227 muskets; Companies A and D, Fourteenth U.S. Colored Infantry, 80 muskets; detachment One hundred and fifteenth Ohio Volunteers, 25 muskets; total, 332 muskets.

The losses are:
                       
Command.
Killed.
Wounded.
Missing.
Total.

 A
O
M
O
M
O
M
O
M
44th U.S. Colored Infantry
....
8
....
35
2
37
2
80
82
Companies A and D, 14th U.S. Infantry.
....
2
....
5
....
18
....
25
25
Detachment 115th Ohio Volunteers
....
2
....
6
....
....
....
8
8
Total
....
12
....
46
2
55
2
113
115

[O = Officers  M = Men  A = Aggregate]

I am, sir, respectfully, your obedient servant,

L. JOHNSON,                       
Colonel, Commanding.
 Lieut. JOHN E. CLELAND,
            Acting Assistant Adjutant-General.

SOURCE: The War of the Rebellion: A Compilation of the Official Records of the Union and Confederate Armies, Series I, Volume 45, Part 1 (Serial No. 93), p. 540-1

Tuesday, July 22, 2014

115th Ohio Infantry

Organized at Camp Massillon, Ohio, and mustered in September 18, 1862. Moved to Cincinnati, Ohio, September 27. Assigned to duty by detachments as Provost Guard and guarding Forts, Arsenals, Store Houses and Magazines at Camps Chase, Dennison, Ohio, Maysville, Covington and Newport, Ky., and Cincinnati, Ohio, till October, 1863. Ordered to Chattanooga, Tenn., October 23, 1863; thence to Murfreesboro, Tenn. Attached to Post of Murfreesboro, Tenn., Dept. of the Cumberland, to January, 1864. 2nd Brigade, 3rd Division, 12th Army Corps, Army of the Cumberland, to April, 1864. Unassigned, 4th Division, 20th Army Corps, Army of the Cumberland, to July, 1864. 1st Brigade, Defences of Nashville & Chattanooga Railroad, Dept. of the Cumberland, to March, 1865. 1st Brigade, 1st Sub-District, District of Middle Tennessee, Dept. of the Cumberland, to June, 1865.

SERVICE. – Duty at Murfreesboro, Tenn., and along line of the Nashville & Chattanooga Railroad, in Block Houses and at Bridges till June, 1865. Regiment was specially selected for this arduous duty because of the great number of skilled mechanics and artisans in its ranks. Skirmishes at Cripple Creek, Woodbury Pike, May 25, 1864 (Detachment). Smyrna August 31, 1864. Block House No. 4 August 31, 1864. Company "B" captured by Wheeler. Block House No. 5 (Co. "B"). Block House No. 2, on Mill Creek, Nashville & Chattanooga Railroad, December 2-3. Block House No. 1 December 3 (Detachment). Block House No. 3 December 3 (Detachment). Block House No. 4 December 4 (Detachment). Block House No. 7 December 4 (Detachment). Siege of Murfreesboro December 5-12. "The Cedars" December 5-7. Lavergne December 8. Duty along Nashville & Chattanooga Railroad from Nashville to Tullahoma, Tenn., till June, 1865. Mustered out June 23, 1865.

Regiment lost during Service 1 Officer and 8 Enlisted men killed and mortally wounded and 4 Officers and 138 Enlisted men by disease. Total 151.

SOURCE: Frederick H. Dyer, A Compendium of the War of the Rebellion, Part 3, p. 1545-6