Friday, December 2, 2022

Diary of Congressman Rutherford B. Hayes: December 17, 1865

Corwin still living; wonderful tenacity of life. Macaulay, speaking of Sydney Smith, said to Mrs. Stowe: "Truly, wit, like charity, covers a multitude of sins. A man who has the faculty of raising a laugh in this sad, earnest world is remembered with indulgence and complacency always."

SOURCE: Charles Richard Williams, editor, Diary and Letters of Rutherford Birchard Hayes, Volume 3, p. 12

Congressman Rutherford B. Hayes to Lucy Webb Hayes: December 17, 1865

WASHINGTON, D. C., December 17, 1865.

MY DEAREST:—  I hope to start home in time to be with you Friday next. The Senate has not yet acted on our adjournment, and it is not quite settled.

The death of Uncle Moses [Boggs], so unlooked for, so peculiarly sad, has impressed me singularly. I don't like to think of it. This is the reason I didn't write when I heard of it. I put off talking about it and will now.

Tom Corwin was struck down in the midst of a scene in which he was one of the happiest and the cause of great happiness to others. He still lingers in a dying condition. — Love to boys all. Affectionately, yours ever,

R.
MRS. HAYES.

SOURCE: Charles Richard Williams, editor, Diary and Letters of Rutherford Birchard Hayes, Volume 3, p. 12

Diary of Congressman Rutherford B. Hayes: January 8, 1866

Mr. Shellabarger made a speech on reconstruction that took better than anything thus far of the kind. He read it from manuscript, but with energy and unction. It was a decided success. He was much complimented. Good for Ohio!

SOURCE: Charles Richard Williams, editor, Diary and Letters of Rutherford Birchard Hayes, Volume 3, p. 12

Thursday, December 1, 2022

Diary of Congressman Rutherford B. Hayes: January 10, 1866

Wilson, Chairman Judiciary [Committee], called up Kelley's bill, providing for universal suffrage (colored) in [the] District of Columbia. Several speeches [were] made. Judge Schofield, of Pennsylvania, made a shrewd and pithy speech. Judge Kelley delivered an offhand brilliant speech. Elocution and rhetoric have evidently been pet studies with him. A very effective, fine thing.

Evening. Caucus decided against the bill of Kelley, preferring qualified to universal suffrage. Universal suffrage is sound in principle. The radical element is right. I was pleased, however, that the despotism of the committees and the older members was rebuked. The Suffrage Bill ought not to have been pressed in advance of other and far more important business. The rights of the majority as against committees and leaders have gained. Much confusion and some feeling. Mr. Stevens quite angry; said he would vote against qualified suffrage; preferred no bill at all! The signs of harmony are more hopeful.

SOURCE: Charles Richard Williams, editor, Diary and Letters of Rutherford Birchard Hayes, Volume 3, p. 12-13

Monday, November 28, 2022

Diary of John Beauchamp Jones: September 21, 1864

Cloudy and somber.

We have authentic intelligence of the defeat of our forces under Gen. Early, near Winchester. Two generals, Rhodes and Godwin, were killed. We lost some guns, and heavily in killed and wounded. The enemy have Winchester, and Early has retreated, bringing off his trains, however. This has caused the croakers to raise a new howl against the President, for they know not what.

Mr. Clapman, our disbursing clerk (appointed under Secretary Randolph), proposed, to-day, to several in his office—jestingly, they supposed—revolution, and installing Gen. Lee as Dictator. It may be a jest to some, but others mean in earnest.

I look for other and more disastrous defeats, unless the speculators are demolished, and the wealthy class put in the ranks. Many of the privates in our armies are fast becoming what is termed machine soldiers, and will ere long cease to fight well having nothing to fight for. Alas, the chivalry have fallen! The lagging land proprietors and slave-owners (as the Yankees shrewdly predicted) want to be captains, etc. or speculators. The poor will not long fight for their oppressors, the money-changers, extortioners, etc., whose bribes keep them out of the service.

Mr. Foote openly advocates a convention; and says the other States will have one certainly: and if Virginia declines to unite in it, she will be “left out in the cold.” This is said of him; I have not heard him say it. But I believe a convention in any State or States, if our disasters continue, will lead to reconstruction, if McClellan be elected. If emancipation, confiscation, etc. be insisted on, the war will never terminate but in final separation.

SOURCE: John Beauchamp Jones, A Rebel War Clerk's Diary at the Confederate States Capital, Volume 2p. 288-9

Diary of John Beauchamp Jones: September 22, 1864

Cloudy; rained much last night.

The following is all we know yet of Early's defeat:

HEADQUARTERS ARMY OF NORTHERN VIRGINIA,                      

September 20th, 1864.

HON. JAMES A. SEDDON.

 

Gen. Early reports that, on the morning of the 19th, the enemy advanced on Winchester, near which place he met his attack, which was resisted from early in the day till near night, when he was compelled to retire. After night he fell back to Newtown, and this morning to Fisher's Hill.

 

Our loss reported to be severe.

 

Major-Gen. Rhodes and Brig.-Gen. Godwin were killed, nobly doing their duty.

 

Three pieces of artillery of King's battalion were lost.

 

The trains and supplies were brought off safely.

 

R. E. LEE.

The profound chagrin produced by this event is fast becoming a sort of reckless unconcern. Many would fight and die in the last ditch, rather than give up Richmond; and many others are somewhat indifferent as to the result, disgusted with the management of affairs.

The President left the city on Monday, ignorant of the defeat of Early, for Georgia. It is said Beauregard is with him; but this is not certain. His private secretary, Mr. Burton Harrison, says he will be absent at least a month, perhaps until Christmas. Congress meets early in November; and before that day we may have terrible events events determining the fate of the war.

We have heard heavy firing down the river all day; but it may not be a serious matter, though a general battle is looked for soon on the south side. Gen. Lee will soon be reinforced materially. The President has adopted a suggestion I made to Gen. Bragg, and a general order is published to-day virtually abolishing the Bureau of Conscription. The business is mostly turned over to the commanders of the Reserves; and conscription is to be executed by Reserve men unfit for duty in the field. All the former conscript officers, guards, details, clerks, etc. fit to bear arms, are to go into the ranks.

“When the cat's away, the mice will play,” is an old saying, and a true one. I saw a note of invitation to-day from Secretary Mallory to Secretary Seddon, inviting him to his house at 5 P.M. to partake of “pea-soup” with Secretary Trenholm. His “peasoup" will be oysters and champagne, and every other delicacy relished by epicures. Mr. Mallory's red face, and his plethoric body, indicate the highest living; and his party will enjoy the dinner while so many of our brave men are languishing with wounds, or pining in a cruel captivity. Nay, they may feast, possibly, while the very pillars of the government are crumbling under the blows of the enemy.

It is said the President has gone to Georgia to prevent Governor Brown, Stephens, H. V. Johnson, Toombs, etc. from making peace (for Georgia) with Sherman.

A splenetic letter from Gov. Vance indicates trouble in that quarter. He says the Confederate States Government threw every possible impediment in bis way when he bought a steamer and imported machinery to manufacture clothing for the North Carolina troops, and now the Confederate States Quartermaster-General is interfering with these factories, because, he says, he, the Governor, is supplying the troops at less expense than the Quartermaster-General would do. He demands details for the factories, and says if the Confederate States Government is determined to come in collision with him, he will meet it. He says he will not submit to any interference. Gov. Vance was splenetic once before, but became amiable enough about the time of the election. Since his election for another term, he shows his teeth again.

SOURCE: John Beauchamp Jones, A Rebel War Clerk's Diary at the Confederate States Capital, Volume 2p. 289-90

Sunday, November 27, 2022

General Robert E. Lee to James A. Seddon, September 20, 1864

DUNN'S HILL, September 20, 1864.

General Early reports that on the morning of the 19th the enemy advanced on Winchester near which place he met his attack, which was resisted from early in the day till near night, when he was compelled to retire. After night he fell back to Newtown and this morning to Fisher's Hill. Our loss is reported severe. Major-General Rodes and Brigadier-General Godwin were killed nobly doing their duty. Three pieces of artillery of King's battalion were lost. The trains and supplies were brought off safely.

R. E. LEE.
Hon. J. A. SEDDON,
        Secretary of War.

SOURCE: The War of the Rebellion: A Compilation of the Official Records of the Union and Confederate Armies, Series I, Volume 43, Part 1 (Serial No. 90), p. 552

Diary of John Beauchamp Jones: September 23, 1864

Raining.

Our loss, killed, wounded, and taken in the battle near Winchester, is estimated by our people at 2500. The enemy say they got 2500 prisoners. The enemy's loss in killed and wounded amounted probably to as much as ours.

Gen. Lee writes that, in his opinion, the time has come for the army to have the benefit of a certain per cent. of the negroes, free and slave, as teamsters, laborers, etc.; and he suggests that there should be a corps of them permanently attached to the army. He says if we do not make use of them in the war, the enemy will use them against us. He contemplates staying where he is during the winter, and proposes building a railroad from his rear to the oak woods, as the pines do not answer a good purpose.

Gen. Hood telegraphs (dated yesterday) his intention to get in the enemy's rear, and intercept supplies from Dalton. Sherman must either attempt to drive him from that position (north bank of the Chattahoochee), or advance farther south with his supplies cut off and our army assaulting his rear.

Mr. Roy (clerk), cousin of Mr. Seddon, said to-day that he regarded the Confederacy near its end, and that the Union would be reconstructed.

Our good friend Dr. Powell brought us a gallon of sorghum molasses to-day.

SOURCE: John Beauchamp Jones, A Rebel War Clerk's Diary at the Confederate States Capital, Volume 2p. 290-1

Diary of John Beauchamp Jones: September 24, 1864

Raining alternate hours and warm. Had a chill this morning, and afterward several spells of blindness, from rushes of blood to the head. Came home and bathed my feet and recovered.

Another disaster! but no great loss of men. Gen. Early was compelled to retreat again on Thursday, 22d inst., the enemy flanking him, and getting in his rear. He lost 12 more guns. This intensifies the chagrin and doubts prevalent in a certain class of the community. However, Lee commands in Virginia, and there may be better luck next time, which will cause everybody's spirits to rise.

Gen. Lee writes a long letter to the Secretary of War, deprecating the usage of the port of Wilmington by the Tallahassee and other cruisers, that go out and ravage the enemy's commerce, such as the destruction of fishing smacks, etc. Already the presence of the Tallahassee and the Edith at Wilmington has caused the loss of one of our blockade-runners, worth more than all the vessels destroyed by the Tallahassee, and the port is now guarded by such an additional number of blockaders that it is with difficulty our steamers can get in with supplies. Gen. L. suggests that Charleston or some other port be used by our cruisers; and that Wilmington be used exclusively for the importation of supplies— quartermaster's, commissary's ordnance, etc. Gen. L. advises that supplies enough for two or three years be brought in, so that we shall not be under apprehension of being destitute hereafter. Such were his ideas. Lieut. Wood, who commands the Tallahassie, is the President's nephew, and gains eclat by his chivalric deeds on the ocean; but we cannot afford to lose our chances of independence to glorify the President's nephew. Gen. Lee but reiterates what has been written on the same subject by Gen. Whiting at Wilmington.

SOURCE: John Beauchamp Jones, A Rebel War Clerk's Diary at the Confederate States Capital, Volume 2p. 291-2

Diary of John Beauchamp Jones: September 25, 1864

Clear and cool. Pains in my head, etc.

Hon. Mr. Foote told G. Fitzhugh early this morning that he had learned Gen. Early's army was scattered to the winds; that the enemy had the Central Railroad (where?) and would soon have all the roads. This is not credited, though it may be so.

There is a mysterious fascination in scenes of death and carnage. As I crossed Franklin Street, going down to the department this morning, I heard on my right the cry of “halt!” and saw a large man in citizen's clothes running toward me pursued by a soldier coming from the direction of Gen. Ewell's headquarters. The man (perhaps a deserter) ran on, and the soldier took deliberate aim with his rifle, and burst & cap.

I stood and watched the man, being riveted to the spot by a strange fascination, although I was nearly in a line with the pursuit. An irresistible curiosity seized me to see the immediate effects of the shot. The man turned up Ninth Street, the soldier fixing another cap as he ran, and, taking deliberate aim, the cap failed to explode the charge again. I saw several persons crossing the street beyond the flying man, who would have been greatly endangered if the rifle had been discharged. In war the destruction of human life excites no more pity than the slaughter of beeves in peace!

SOURCE: John Beauchamp Jones, A Rebel War Clerk's Diary at the Confederate States Capital, Volume 2p. 292

Diary of John Beauchamp Jones: September 26, 1864

 Bright and cool.

Gen. Early is still falling back; on Saturday he was at Port Republic, but he will soon be reinforced, and may turn the tide on Sheridan.

A long letter was received at the department to-day from Gov. Brown, absolutely refusing to respond to the President's call for the militia of that State. He says he will not encourage the President's ambitious projects by placing in his hands, and under his unconditional control, all that remains to preserve the reserved rights of his State. He bitterly and offensively criticises the President's management of military affairs—sending Morgan into Kentucky, Wheeler into East, and Forrest into West Tennessee, instead of combining all upon Sherman's rear and cutting his communications. He says Georgia has fifty regiments in Virginia, and if the President won't send reinforcements, then he demands the return of Georgia troops, and he will endeavor to defend the State without his aid, etc.

SOURCE: John Beauchamp Jones, A Rebel War Clerk's Diary at the Confederate States Capital, Volume 2p. 292-3

Diary of John Beauchamp Jones: September 27, 1864

Bright and pleasant.

We have rumors of heavy fighting yesterday near Staunton, but no authentic accounts.

A dispatch from Gen. R. Taylor says Gen. Forrest had gained a victory at Athens, Ala., capturing some 1500 prisoners, 500 horses, etc. etc.

We still hear the thunder of artillery down the river-the two armies shelling each other, I suppose, as yet at a safe distance. A few more days and the curtain will rise again—Lee and Grant the principal actors in the tragedy!

The President is making patriotic speeches in Alabama and Georgia.

Mr. Hudson, of Alabama, proposes to deliver to the government 5,000,000 pounds of bacon for the same number of pounds cotton, delivered at the same place.

Our cotton agent in Mississippi is authorized by the government here to sell cotton in exposed situations to the enemy's agents for specie, and to buy for Confederate notes.

The funeral expenses of Gen. Morgan the other day amounted to $1500; the Quartermaster-General objects to paying it, and sends the bill to the Secretary for instructions.

The following is a copy of Gen. Lee's indorsement on Lieut.Col. Moseby's report of his operations from the 1st of March to the 11th of September, 1864:

HEADQUARTERS, ARMY NORTHERN VIRGINIA,               

September 19th, 1864.


Respectfully forwarded to the Adjutant and Inspector-General for the information of the department. Attention is invited to the activity and skill of Col. Moseby, and the intelligence and courage of the officers and men of his command, as displayed in this report.

 

With the loss of little more than 20 men, he has killed, wounded, and captured, during the period embraced in this report, about 1200 of the enemy, and taken more than 1600 horses and mules, 230 beef cattle, and 85 wagons and ambulances, without counting many smaller operations. The services rendered by Col. Moseby and his command in watching and reporting the enemy's movements have also been of great value. His operations have been highly creditable to himself and his command.

 

R. E. LEE, General.

Official: JOHN BLAIR HOGE,

Major and Assistant Adjutant-General.

SOURCE: John Beauchamp Jones, A Rebel War Clerk's Diary at the Confederate States Capital, Volume 2p. 293-4

Official Reports: Skirmish near Greenwich, Va., March 9, 1864— Report of Major George F. McCabe, Thirteenth Pennsylvania Cavalry.

Report of Maj. George F. McCabe, Thirteenth Pennsylvania Cavalry.

HDQRS. DETACHMENT 13TH PENNSYLVANIA CAVALRY,        
March 10, 1864.

LIEUTENANT: I have the honor to report that the party who made the attack on the detachment Thirteenth Pennsylvania Cavalry yesterday, 9th March, 1864, consisted of 40 men, under command of Mosby in person. I came up to him at Buckland Mills about 3.30 p.m. yesterday, and at once charged him. His command broke when I was a pistol-shot from him. I continued after him and ran his party through Thoroughfare Gap and on to his camp at Plains Station on the Manassas Gap road. I found his command encamped at that place in Sibley and shelter tents. He got his whole command in line, dismounted, behind a stone fence at that place, and I did not have men enough to attack him in his camp. I drove him so hard yesterday as to compel him to release 2 men he had captured, and they cut off their overcoats and blankets from their saddles so as to be lighter mounted, that they could get away. I do not think that there are more than 100 men in the camp at Plains Station, but I believe he can raise 500 men in a very short time. There would be no trouble to hem his camp in by parties going from Warrenton and this place.

Your obedient servant,
G. F. McCABE,        
Major Thirteenth Pennsylvania Cavalry.
Lieutenant SWAN,
        Actg. Asst. Adjt. Gen., Second Div., Fifth Army Corps.

[First indorsement.]

HEADQUARTERS SECOND DIVISION, FIFTH CORPS,        
March 10, 1864.

Respectfully forwarded.

This party was sent out to re-enforce one sent from Bristoe, which was being roughly handled.

R. B. AYRES,        
Brigadier-General, Commanding.

[Second indorsement.]

HEADQUARTERS FIFTH ARMY CORPS,        
March 11, 1864.

Respectfully forwarded for the information of the major-general commanding Army of the Potomac.

GEO. SYKES,        
Major-General, Commanding.

ADDENDA.1

March 9, a scout of 40 men, under the command of Lieutenant White, was attacked by the enemy in the vicinity of Greenwich. The party making the attack was composed of the Fourth Virginia Cavalry, Chincapin Rangers, and a detachment of Mosby's command. The casualties numbered 9, all taken prisoners; 4 wounded, now in hospital at Washington, D.C.
_______________

1 From the return of Second Brigade, Second Division, Cavalry Corps, for March, 1864

SOURCE: The War of the Rebellion: A Compilation of the Official Records of the Union and Confederate Armies, Series I, Volume 33(Serial No. 60), p. 236-7

Official Reports: Skirmishes near Charlestown and at Kabletown, W. Va., March 10, 1864 No. 3.—Report of Lieut. Col. John S. Mosby, Forty-third Virginia Cavalry Battalion, including operations to May 1.

No. 3.

Report of Lieut. Col. John S. Mosby, Forty-third Virginia Cavalry Battalion,
including operations to May 1.

SEPTEMBER 11, 1864.

COLONEL; I have the honor to submit, for the information of the commanding general, the following brief report of the operations of this command since the 1st day March last.

On March 10,1 with a detachment of about 40 men, I defeated a superior force of the enemy's cavalry near Greenwich, severely wounding 3, and capturing 9 prisoners, 10 horses, arms, &c. On the same day Lieut. A. E. Richards, with another detachment of about 30 men, surprised an outpost of the enemy near Charlestown, killed the major commanding and a lieutenant, several privates, and brought off 21 prisoners with their horses, arms, &c. In neither engagement did my command sustain any loss.

During the months of March and April but few opportunities were offered for making any successful attacks on the enemy, the continual annoyances to which they had been subjected during the winter causing them to exert great vigilance in guarding against surprises and interruptions of their communications. During most of these months I was myself engaged in scouting in the enemy's rear for Major-General Stuart and collecting information, which was regularly transmitted to his headquarters, concerning the movements, numbers, and distribution of the enemy's forces both east and west of the Blue Ridge. During this time my men were mostly employed in collecting forage from the country bordering on the Potomac.

About April 15 Captain Richards routed a marauding party of the enemy's cavalry at Waterford, killing and wounding 5 or 6, and bringing off 6 or 8 prisoners, 15 horses, arms, &c.

About April 25 I attacked an outpost near Hunter's Mills, in Fairfax, capturing 5 prisoners and 18 horses. The prisoners and horses were sent back under charge of Lieutenant Hunter, while I went off on a scout in another direction. The enemy pursued and captured the lieutenant and 6 of the horses.

*          *          *          *          *          *          *          *          *          *

I have the honor to be, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

JNO. S. MOSBY,        
Lieutenant-Colonel, Commanding.
Lieutenant-Colonel TAYLOR,
        Assistant Adjutant-General.

[Indorsement.]

HEADQUARTERS ARMY OF NORTHERN VIRGINIA,        
September 19, 1864.

Respectfully forwarded to the Adjutant and Inspector General, for the information of the Department.

Attention is invited to the activity and skill of Colonel Mosby, and the intelligence and courage of the officers and men of his command, as displayed in this report. With the loss of little more than 20 men, he has killed, wounded, and captured during the period embraced in the report about 1,200 of the enemy, and taken more than 1,600 horses and mules, 230 beef-cattle, and 85 wagons and ambulances, without counting many smaller operations. The services rendered by Colonel Mosby and his command in watching and reporting the enemy's movements have also been of great value. His operations have been highly creditable to himself and his command.

R. E. LEE,        
General.
_______________

* March 9, See p. 236.

SOURCE: The War of the Rebellion: A Compilation of the Official Records of the Union and Confederate Armies, Series I, Volume 33(Serial No. 60), p. 248-9

Diary of John Beauchamp Jones: September 28, 1864

Bright; subsequently cloudy and warm rain.

Staunton was entered by the enemy's cavalry on Monday afternoon.

We have no news whatever to-day from any quarter. But the deep booming of cannon is still heard down the river, foreboding an awful conflict soon.

I saw three 10-inch Columbiads at the Petersburg depot to-day; they are going to move them toward Petersburg, I believe.

Gold is thirty for one to-day, and still rising, Forrest's exploit having done nothing to revive confidence in Treasury notes here.

SOURCE: John Beauchamp Jones, A Rebel War Clerk's Diary at the Confederate States Capital, Volume 2p. 294

Diary of John Beauchamp Jones: September 29, 1864

Bright and beautiful.

As I walked down to the department, heavy and brisk cannonading below assailed the ear. It was different from the ordinary daily shelling, and to my familiar senses, it could only be a BATTLE. The sounds continued, and even at my desk in the department the vibrations were very perceptible.

About 10 o'clock, when walking down Main Street (the cannon still heard), I met Robert Tyler and Mr. Foote, member of Congress, the latter in some excitement, denouncing the management of affairs by the Executive. He said if Richmond were lost, he should move that the people take matters in their own hands, and proclaim a DICTATOR. Mr. Tyler, commanding his temper, banteringly told him that he ran some risk of being arrested, tried by drum-head court-martial, and shot, before night. Mr. Foote whirled away, repeating his desperate purpose; and Tyler repeating, more gravely, that he might be arrested for treasonable language-and ought to be.

Mr. Tyler then invited me to join him at breakfast at a neighboring restaurant, where we had each a loaf of bread, a cup of coffee with milk (but brown sugar), and three eggs. The bill was sixteen dollars!

When I returned to the department, information came that the enemy had captured Fort Harrison (Signal Hill), near Chaffin's Bluff, and were advancing toward the city. From that moment much excitement sprung up (the greatest I have ever known here), and all the local organizations were immediately ordered out. Not only this, but squads of guards were sent into the streets everywhere with orders to arrest every able-bodied man they met, regardless of papers; and this produced a consternation among the civilians. The offices and government shops were closed, and the toesin sounded for hours, by order of the Governor, frightening some of the women.

At 2 P. M. the fight was nearer, and it was reported that the enemy were at the intermediate fortifications—three miles distant.

From the observatory on the War Department we could see the puffs of white smoke from our guns; but these were at the intermediate line, several miles distant, and the enemy were, of course, beyond. We could see our cannon firing from right to left at least a mile in length; and the enemy had evidently made much progress toward the city. The firing then ceased, however, at 3 P.M., indicating that the enemy had withdrawn from that point; but the booming of artillery was still heard farther to the right on or near the river. And this continued until the present writing, 5 P.M. We have no particulars; but it is reported that the enemy were handsomely repulsed. Clouds of dust can be seen with the telescope in that direction, which appears to the naked eye to be smoke. It arises no doubt from the march of troops, sent by Gen. Lee. We must soon have something definite from the scene of action.

Half-past five P.M. Gen. Ewell dispatches that the enemy's attack on Fort Gilmer (five miles below the same we saw) was handsomely repulsed.

A dispatch from Gen. Pemberton, on Williamsburg Road, says there is no immediate danger there.

Another dispatch from Georgia says Forrest has captured 800 more men somewhere in Alabama, on the railroad.

At night, distant cannon heard. Gen. Ewell said in his last dispatch that as soon as certain reinforcements came up he would take the offensive, attacking the enemy. The conflict recedes, and I presume he is driving the enemy back.

Mr. Foote intimates that the President will not return to Richmond, and did not intend to return.

SOURCE: John Beauchamp Jones, A Rebel War Clerk's Diary at the Confederate States Capital, Volume 2p. 294-6

Diary of John Beauchamp Jones: September 30, 1864

Cloudy, and occasional showers.

None of the papers except the Whig were published this morning, the printers, etc. being called out to defend the city. Every device of the military authorities has been employed to put the people here in the ranks. Guards everywhere, on horseback and on foot, in the city and at the suburbs, are arresting pedestrians, who, if they have not passes from Gen. Kemper, are hurried to some of the depots or to the City Square (iron palings), and confined until marched to the field or released. Two of the clerks of the War Department, who went down to the Spottswood Hotel to hear the news, although having the Secretary's own details, were hustled off to a prison on Cary Street to report to Lieut. Bates, who alone could release them. But when they arrived, no Lieut. Bates was there, and they found themselves incarcerated with some five hundred others of all classes and conditions. Here they remained cooped up for an hour, when they espied an officer who knew them, and who had them released.

To-day the guards arrested Judges Reagan and Davis, Postmaster-General and Attorney-General, both members of the cabinet, because neither of them were over fifty years old. Judge Reagan grew angry and stormed a little; but both were released immediately.

Gen. Lee dispatched Gen. Bragg, at 9 P.M. last night, that all the assaults of the enemy on Fort Gilmer had been repulsed, the enemy losing many in killed, and wounded, and prisoners, while our loss was small.

And we have driven the Yankees from Staunton, and have them in full retreat again as far as Harrisonburg.

To-day at 2 P.M. another battle occurred at or near Fort Harrison or Signal Hill, supposed to be an attempt on our part to retake the post.

I never heard more furious shelling, and fear our loss was frightful, provided it was our assault on the enemy's lines. We could see the white smoke, from the observatory, floating along the horizon over the woods and down the river. The melee of sounds was terrific: heavy siege guns (from our steam-rams, probably) mingled with the incessant roar of field artillery. At 3 P.M. all was comparatively quiet, and we await intelligence of the result.

SOURCE: John Beauchamp Jones, A Rebel War Clerk's Diary at the Confederate States Capital, Volume 2p. 296-7

Thursday, November 24, 2022

Diary of Private Daniel L. Ambrose: Thursday, November 12, 1863

It appears that our Division has come to a stand; that Sherman and his corps have gone on unchecked to join Rosecrans. In the afternoon we move across Richland Creek; pass through Pulaski, and go into camp. All quiet this evening.

SOURCE: Daniel Leib Ambrose, History of the Seventh Regiment Illinois Volunteer Infantry, p. 206

Diary of Private Daniel L. Ambrose: Friday, November 13, 1863

This morning a large detail from the regiment, under the command of Major Estabrook, reports to Colonel Weaver, Second Iowa, to accompany the Division train, now headed for Columbia, Tennessee, to draw supplies. We are ordered to take the advance on the pike running through Columbia to Nashville. Traveling briskly all day, we go into camp for the night six miles from Columbia.

SOURCE: Daniel Leib Ambrose, History of the Seventh Regiment Illinois Volunteer Infantry, p. 206

Diary of Private Daniel L. Ambrose: Saturday, November 14, 1863

Early this morning we move on and arrive in Columbia about nine o'clock. Columbia is a beautiful and wealthy town, situated on Duck River. Captain Carpenter, Commissary of Subsistance, receives a dispatch informing him of no supplies now on hand at Davis' Station, the point beyond Duck River as far as the trains from Nashville run on this railroad. We immediately cross the river and proceed about five miles from Columbia on the Nashville pike, and go into camp, with orders to remain there until supplies arrive from Nashville.

SOURCE: Daniel Leib Ambrose, History of the Seventh Regiment Illinois Volunteer Infantry, p. 206

Diary of Private Daniel L. Ambrose: Monday, November 16, 1863

This morning the train arrives at Davis' Station, from Nashville, with supplies. The wagons are now being loaded up; this evening all being loaded, we receive orders to be ready in the morning to return to Pulaski, Tennessee.

SOURCE: Daniel Leib Ambrose, History of the Seventh Regiment Illinois Volunteer Infantry, p. 206

Diary of Private Daniel L. Ambrose: Tuesday, November 17, 1863

We move early this morning; it takes some time to cross Duck River, the river having risen considerably. We go into camp for the night, half way between Columbia and Pulaski.

SOURCE: Daniel Leib Ambrose, History of the Seventh Regiment Illinois Volunteer Infantry, p. 207

Diary of Private Daniel L. Ambrose: Wednesday, November 18, 1863

By day-light the train is moving; we arrive in camp at Pulaski by sun-down, and find it deserted, the regiment having gone on a scout.

SOURCE: Daniel Leib Ambrose, History of the Seventh Regiment Illinois Volunteer Infantry, p. 207

Diary of Private Daniel L. Ambrose: Thursday, November 19, 1863

It is raining this morning, but soon ceases and clears off; the sun now shines refreshingly. This evening the regiment arrives back from their scout, with thirty rebels captured at Lawrenceburg, Tennessee. All seem in fine spirits; much elated over the success of their expedition, and none more so than Colonel Rowett, who never seems more in his element than when on Charley at the head of his regiment, thundering over the hills and through the ravines of Tennessee. There is always power felt where he moves.

SOURCE: Daniel Leib Ambrose, History of the Seventh Regiment Illinois Volunteer Infantry, p. 207

Diary of Private Daniel L. Ambrose: Friday, November 20, 1863

The companies are busy to-day getting their foot-sore mules shod, preparatory to another expedition, for rumor already has it that the regiment will leave Pulaski to-morrow morning on some mission.

SOURCE: Daniel Leib Ambrose, History of the Seventh Regiment Illinois Volunteer Infantry, p. 207

Diary of Private Daniel L. Ambrose: Saturday, November 21, 1863

Again rumors are verified. Pursuant to order, the regiment moves from Pulaski this morning with three days' rations. It is said we are bound for Corinth, Mississippi, to look after the camp and garrison equipage belonging to the Second Division. After travelling thirty miles, we go into camp at Lexington, Alabama. As usual the regiment forages, and chickens still continue to fall victims to the Seventh. We have a good supper to-night; such as soldiers enjoy.

SOURCE: Daniel Leib Ambrose, History of the Seventh Regiment Illinois Volunteer Infantry, p. 207-8

Diary of Private Daniel L. Ambrose: Sunday, November 22, 1863

Ere it is light the bugle is sounded, and after hastily dispatching our breakfast, we move on our way. All along the road to-day we encounter squads of rebels, scouting parties from Johnson's and Roddy's commands, all of which goes to prove that the raiders Johnson or Roddy, or both, are on the north side of the Tennessee, and in consequence we anticipate considerable opposition before we reach our destination. Sure enough, at four o'clock P. M., our advance is checked. Colonel Rowett soon dismounts the regiments and forms a battle line. Our skirmishers are advanced and firing soon commences in every direction, sounding as though we were surrounded. A scout is now seen dashing from the brush to where the Colonel stands. He informs him of our danger and the fearful odds against us; that the rebels would soon be upon us if we remained there any longer. The bugle is sounded; the men spring into their saddles. Charley is champing and neighing. The Colonel's eye seems to be everywhere. He is now dashing down the road, with the regiment closely following. On we go towards Waterloo. The rebels hover on our flanks, front and rear. There is promiscuous firing all evening. They seem loth to throw any considerable force against us; feel loth to try our steel. By nine P. M., we arrive at Waterloo, four miles from Eastport, Tennessee River. The rebels soon abandon their expected game. At Waterloo we go into camp, having traveled sixty-five miles since morning, capturing twelve rebels during the day and evening.

SOURCE: Daniel Leib Ambrose, History of the Seventh Regiment Illinois Volunteer Infantry, p. 208-9

George F. Gilbert to William Preston Smith, November 29, 1859—5 p.m.

Washington, Nov. 29th, 1859-5, P. M.
W. P. Smith,

Col. Lee, U. S. army, wishes you to meet him at depot on arrival of 5.20 train, to make arrangements for transportation of two hundred and twenty U. S. men to the Ferry in the morning. They will reach Baltimore on the Norfolk boat.

G. F. GILBERT.

SOURCE: B. H. Richardson, Annapolis, Maryland, Publisher, Correspondence Relating to the Insurrection at Harper's Ferry, 17th October, 1859, p. 59

William Preston Smith to A. P. Shutt, November 29, 1859

Cumberland, Nov. 29, 1859.
A. P. Shutt,
        Harper's Ferry.

Did you take the gentlemen to Charlestown, to-day? Did they see the prisoners? Have the private car cared for while they may be absent from it, or it may be entered and robbed. Tell the Agent of the Winchester Company they can have the use of the two passenger cars we left at Harper's Ferry to-day, if they require them until Saturday morning next. Explain this to Mr. Donohoo.

Col. Lee with 250 U. S. troops from Fortress Munroe, leave Baltimore by special train, Mail time to-morrow, as a further protection to government property at Ferry.

Telegraph me fully here, to-night, if anything of interest is on foot. Tell all newspaper men reports of our trains being invaded generally by armed men are untrue. I expect to be down on Express train to-morrow night and would like to see you as I pass. It is important that our telegraph office and its business should be much more private than it is. All idlers or others not having business there must be kept out, and if necessary ask Capt. Barton, or some State officer to post sentinels there.

W.P. SMITH.

SOURCE: B. H. Richardson, Annapolis, Maryland, Publisher, Correspondence Relating to the Insurrection at Harper's Ferry, 17th October, 1859, p. 59-60

William Preston Smith to Oliver Hoblitzell, November 29, 1859—5:26 p.m.

Cumberland, Nov. 29th, 1859–5.26 P. M.
O. Hoblitzell,

Get Mr. England and go with him to see the President on his return, who will give my instructions about passengers for Baltimore for the main stem, verbally. Give Mr. Parsons same directions after seeing the President, as above. I will see Mr. Ford who will see Barry and McCaffrey. Tell the President I have arranged with Mr. Diffey to go out from Baltimore on both Western trains on Thursday. Give him a copy of my dispatch to Perham.

W. P. SMITH.

SOURCE: B. H. Richardson, Annapolis, Maryland, Publisher, Correspondence Relating to the Insurrection at Harper's Ferry, 17th October, 1859, p. 60

Wednesday, November 23, 2022

William Preston Smith to James Post,* November 29, 1859

Cumberland Nov. 29th, 1859.
James Post,
        Martinsburg:

We gave you the order to ride entirely on the authority of the State officers of Virginia, and cannot renew it without their express requisition to that effect.

W. P. SMITH.
_______________

* A detctive acting under military orders.

SOURCE: B. H. Richardson, Annapolis, Maryland, Publisher, Correspondence Relating to the Insurrection at Harper's Ferry, 17th October, 1859, p. 60

Oliver Hoblitzell to William Preston Smith, November 29, 1859—6:19 p.m.

Baltimore, Nov. 29, 1859-6.19 P. M.
W. P. Smith,
        Cumberland:

Authorities are considering whether they will send to Harper's Ferry 252 soldiers from Fort Monroe, or but half that number, by morning train. The latter I have already arranged to go with mail train, but if they decide upon sending the whole number, it would probably be best to send special train ahead of mail.

What do you say? I am waiting Col. Lee's decision as to number.

Have seen President and made later appointments with him, but will manage to be in telegraph office at 8 o'clock.

O. HOBLITZEL L.

SOURCE: B. H. Richardson, Annapolis, Maryland, Publisher, Correspondence Relating to the Insurrection at Harper's Ferry, 17th October, 1859, p. 60

William Preston Smith to Oliver Hoblitzell, November 29, 1859—7:36 p.m.

Cumberland, November 29th, 1859–7.36 P. M.
O. Hoblitzell.

If there are more than nine cars needed in morning, send two engines, putting soldiers on first train, with orders to flag the other and run prompt on mail time. If there are any emigrants or many troops from Washington at Relay, there may be over nine trains required. Watch train's departure, to-morrow, and telegraph me all about it at Piedmont, saying whether there is any crowd besides soldiers on board.

W. P. SMITH.

SOURCE: B. H. Richardson, Annapolis, Maryland, Publisher, Correspondence Relating to the Insurrection at Harper's Ferry, 17th October, 1859, p. 61

William Preston Smith to Oliver Hoblitzell, November [29],* 1859—7:48 p.m.

Cumberland, Nov. [29],* 1859–7.48 P. M.
O. Hoblitzell.

Telegraph W. W. Shore, New York, only this, viz:

Virginia authorities to-day proclaim that no visitors will be permitted to witness the execution.

W. P. SMITH.
_______________

* Date published is November 27, 1859 7:48 pm however it’s placement in the text between correspondence dated November 29, 1859—7:36 p.m. & November 29,1859—8 p.m. leads me to believe this piece of correspondence should be dated November 29, 1859 7:48 p.m.

SOURCE: B. H. Richardson, Annapolis, Maryland, Publisher, Correspondence Relating to the Insurrection at Harper's Ferry, 17th October, 1859, p. 61


Oliver Hoblitzell to William Preston Smith, November 29,1859—8 p.m.

Baltimore, Nov. 29, 1859-8 P. M.
W. P. Smith,
        Cumberland:

Your's received and acted upon.

Col. Lee has decided to take all the troops (252) to Harper's Ferry, and will command them himself. Will send soldiers on first train with orders for it to flag the second and run on prompt mail time.

Will not have any emigrants, and have no notice of troops from Washington, but will look out for this. Will agents, &c., be notified of this train by yourself, or Mr. Diffey, or shall I do so?

O. HOBLIT ZELL.

SOURCE: B. H. Richardson, Annapolis, Maryland, Publisher, Correspondence Relating to the Insurrection at Harper's Ferry, 17th October, 1859, p. 61

William Preston Smith to W. W. Shore, November 29, 1859—8:20 p.m.

Baltimore, Nov. 29, 1859-8.20 P. M.
W. W. Shore,
        Daily Times, New York:

Virginia authorities to-day proclaim that no visitors will be permitted to witness execution.

W. P. SMITH.

SOURCE: B. H. Richardson, Annapolis, Maryland, Publisher, Correspondence Relating to the Insurrection at Harper's Ferry, 17th October, 1859, p. 61

William Preston Smith to Oliver Hoblitzell, November 29, 1859—9:05 p.m.

Cumberland, November 29th, 1859–9.05 P. M.
O. Hoblitzell.

Mr. Diffey, will be at the Ferry and give the necessary orders for running the train with the troops to-morrow.

W. P. SMITH.

SOURCE: B. H. Richardson, Annapolis, Maryland, Publisher, Correspondence Relating to the Insurrection at Harper's Ferry, 17th October, 1859, p. 62

William Preston Smith to Oliver Hoblitzell, November 29, 1859—9:15 p.m.

Cumberland, November 29th, 1859–9.15 P. M.
O. Hoblitzell.

New York and other Eastern papers of yesterday, contain Associated dispatch, dated Baltimore, and sent, I suppose, by Alexander Fulton, American Building, who is their Baltimore Agent.

It stated that all the trains of our road were entered by armed men, and the passengers subjected to scrutiny in search of suspicious persons. I want you to see Mr. Fulton to-night, in person, or send him this dispatch at once, assuring him in my name, that the statement is untrue, and is calculated at the same time to seriously interfere with the through passenger business of our road. Ask him if he will not, in justice to us, send a general dispatch in all directions to-night, to the effect, that no such invasion of our cars or annoyance to passengers, is practised or permitted. Tell him to mention at the same time, that the Company, acting under the advice of the Virginia authorities, has arranged to take no passengers to the vicinity of Harper's Ferry, at the time of the executions, except such as are believed to be traveling for legitimate objects.

Tell Fulton, also, that the report of troops being fired on at points of our road last night, is entirely unauthentic.

W. P. SMITH.

SOURCE: B. H. Richardson, Annapolis, Maryland, Publisher, Correspondence Relating to the Insurrection at Harper's Ferry, 17th October, 1859, p. 62

William Preston Smith to J. P. Jackson, November 29, 1859

Cumberland, Nov. 29, 1859.
J. P. Jackson,
        Vice Pres’t N. J. R. R. Co.,

New York or Newark, N. J. Great alarm exists here from expectations of large forces of desperadoes from North, East and West, to attempt rescue of Virginia prisoners. Will you favor us by promptly dispatching any information you may have respecting parties who may be of this character taking your trains for the South, and also advise us personally if any unusual party of unknown men start for this direction.

W. P. SMITH.

SOURCE: B. H. Richardson, Annapolis, Maryland, Publisher, Correspondence Relating to the Insurrection at Harper's Ferry, 17th October, 1859, p. 62

Monday, November 21, 2022

3rd Missouri Enrolled Militia Infantry.

Called into service September 25, 1864, to resist Price's invasion of Missouri. Relieved from active service October 31, 1864.

SOURCE: Frederick H. Dyer, A Compendium of the War of the Rebellion, Part 3, p. 1323

3rd Missouri Provisional Enrolled Militia Infantry.

Duty in District of Northwest Missouri at St. Joseph and in Henry and St. Clair Counties operating against guerrillas.

SOURCE: Frederick H. Dyer, A Compendium of the War of the Rebellion, Part 3, p. 1323

3rd Missouri Colored Infantry.

Organized at Benton Barracks, Mo. Designation changed to 67th United States Colored Troops March 11, 1864 (which see).

SOURCE: Frederick H. Dyer, A Compendium of the War of the Rebellion, Part 3, p. 1323

3rd St. Louis City Guard Infantry.

Organized September 25, 1864, for the Defence of the city of St. Louis during Price's invasion of Missouri. Relieved from active service October 31, 1864.

SOURCE: Frederick H. Dyer, A Compendium of the War of the Rebellion, Part 3, p. 1324

4th Battalion Missouri State Militia Infantry. ("Thompson's.")

Organized for six months at Rockfort, Mo., and mustered in November 9, 1861. Engaged in scouting and guard duty in Holt and Atchison Counties till February, 1862. Mustered out February 11, 1862.

SOURCE: Frederick H. Dyer, A Compendium of the War of the Rebellion, Part 3, p. 1324

4th Missouri Infantry.—(3 Months.)

Organized at St. Louis, Mo., April 22, 1861. Capture of Camp Jackson, St. Louis, May 10. Moved to Bird's Point, Mo., May 21; thence to Cairo, Ill. Guard duty along Pacific Railroad. Moved to Cairo, Ill., thence to St. Louis, Mo., and to Fulton, Mo. Mustered out July 30, 1861.

SOURCE: Frederick H. Dyer, A Compendium of the War of the Rebellion, Part 3, p. 1324

4th Missouri Infantry.—(3 Years.)

Organized at St. Louis, Mo., by consolidation of Gasconade Battalion and 3rd Regiment United States Reserve Corps January, 1862. On duty in Districts of Southwest Missouri and St. Louis at Pacific City and St. Louis till February, 1863. Mustered out February 1, 1863.

SOURCE: Frederick H. Dyer, A Compendium of the War of the Rebellion, Part 3, p. 1324

4th United States Reserve Corps Infantry.—(3 Months.)

Organized at St. Louis, Mo., May 8, 1861. Attached to Lyons' Command, Army of the West. Capture of Camp Jackson, St. Louis, May 10. Ordered to Rolla, Mo., May 16, and duty there till June 30. (Cos. "A" and "B" at garrison, Waynesville, till June 30.) March to Springfield, Mo., July 1-5 (except Co. "C" at Waynesville and Co. "L" at Lebanon). March to Mt. Vernon to reinforce General Sigel July 7. Return to Springfield July 9. Moved to St. Louis July 17. To Bird's Point, Mo., July 18, and duty there till August. Mustered out August 18, 1861.

Regiment lost during service 4 Enlisted men killed and 6 Enlisted men by disease.

SOURCE: Frederick H. Dyer, A Compendium of the War of the Rebellion, Part 3, p. 1324

4th United States Reserve Corps Infantry—(3 Years.)

Organized at St. Louis, Mo., September, 1861. Duty in District of St. Louis till January, 1862. Mustered out January 13, 1862.

SOURCE: Frederick H. Dyer, A Compendium of the War of the Rebellion, Part 3, p. 1324

4th Missouri Enrolled Militia Infantry.

Called into service September 25, 1864, to repel Price's invasion of Missouri. Relieved from active service October 31, 1864.

SOURCE: Frederick H. Dyer, A Compendium of the War of the Rebellion, Part 3, p. 1324

4th Missouri Provisional Enrolled Militia Infantry.

Placed on duty April 23, 1863. Placed on duty in District of North Missouri operating against guerrillas in Henry, St. Clair, Ray and Carroll Counties at St. Joseph. Chillicothe, Carrollton, Lisbon and Richmond operations in Ray and Carroll Counties August 12-16, 1864. Skirmish at Fredericksburg August 12. Action at Glasgow October 15 (Detachment).

SOURCE: Frederick H. Dyer, A Compendium of the War of the Rebellion, Part 3, p. 1324

4th Missouri Colored Infantry

Organized at Benton Barracks, Mo. Designation changed to 68th United States Colored Troops March 11, 1864 (which see).

SOURCE: Frederick H. Dyer, A Compendium of the War of the Rebellion, Part 3, p. 1324

4th St. Louis City Guard Infantry

Organized September 25, 1861, for the Defence of the city of St. Louis during Price's invasion of Missouri. Relieved from active service October 31, 1864.

SOURCE: Frederick H. Dyer, A Compendium of the War of the Rebellion, Part 3, p. 1324

Sunday, October 23, 2022

Official Reports of the Campaign in North Alabama and Middle Tennessee, November 14, 1864-January 23, 1865: No. 245. — Report of Maj. Gen. William W. Loring, C. S. Army, commanding division, of operations November 29-30, 1864.

No. 245.

Report of Maj. Gen. William W. Loring, C. S. Army, commanding division,
of operations November 29-30, 1864.

HEADQUARTERS LORING'S DIVISION, STEWART'S CORPS,                
ARMY OF TENNESSEE,        
Near Nashville, Tenn., December 9, 1864.

CAPTAIN: In accordance with circular from army headquarters calling for a report of the number of flags lost in the engagements of 29th and 30th of November, I have to report four, those of the Third, Twenty-second, and Thirty-third Mississippi Regiments, Featherston's brigade, and that of the Fifteenth Regiment, of Adams' brigade, and inclose herewith a statement from each brigade commander.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,
W. W. LORING,        
Major-General, Commanding.
Capt. W. D. GALE,
        Assistant Adjutant-General.
_______________

[Inclosure No. 1.]

HEADQUARTERS FEATHERSTON'S BRIGADE,        
December 9, 1864.

MAJOR: In obedience to orders from army headquarters I would respectfully report that three stand of colors were captured from my brigade on the 30th of November, belonging to the Third, Twenty-second, and Thirty-third Mississippi Regiments. The color-bearers of the Third and Twenty-second planted their colors on the enemy's works, and were wounded and captured with their colors. The color-bearer of the Thirty-third was killed some fifteen paces from the works, when Lieut. H. C. Shaw, of Company K, carried them forward, and when in the act of planting them on the works was killed, his body falling in the trench, the colors falling in the works.

Very respectfully,
W. S. FEATHERSTON,        
Brigadier-General.
Major ROBINSON,
        Assistant Adjutant-General.
_______________

[Inclosure No. 2.]

HEADQUARTERS ADAMS' BRIGADE, LORING'S DIVISION,        
December 9, 1864.

MAJOR: In obedience to orders from army headquarters I have the honor to report that one flag was lost in the engagement of the 30th ultimo of the Fifteenth Mississippi Regiment. Four men were shot down in bearing it.

I am, major, very respectfully, your obedient servant,
ROBERT LOWRY,        
Colonel, Commanding Brigade.
Maj. HENRY ROBINSON,
        Assistant Adjutant-General.
_______________

[Inclosure No. 3.]

BRIGADE HEADQUARTERS,        
December 9, 1864.

I would respectfully report that no flags were lost in this brigade on the 29th and 30th ultimo.

Respectfully,
JOHN SNODGRASS,        
Colonel, Commanding Brigade.
Maj. H. ROBINSON,
        Assistant Adjutant-General.
_______________

ADDENDA.

Report of the killed, wounded, and missing of Loring's division in the engagement of November 30, 1864, near Franklin, Tenn.

Command.

Killed.

Wounded.

Missing.

Aggregate.

Officers.

Men.

Officers.

Men.

Officers.

Men.

Featherston's brigade

16

60

22

178

4

72

352

Adams' brigade

10

34

39

232

1

21

337

Scott's brigade

2

29

23

125

2

6

187

Total.

28

123

84

535

7

99

876


Respectfully submitted.
Capt. W. D. GALE,        
Assistant Adjutant-General.
W. W. LORING,
        Major-General, Commanding.
_______________

HEADQUARTERS FRENCH'S DIVISION,        
Near Nashville, Tenn., December 10, 1864.

Report of flags lost in engagement November 30, 1864:

Cockrell's brigade: Second and Sixth Missouri Infantry lost one. Ector's and Sears' brigades not in engagement; absent on detached service.

Respectfully submitted.
S. G. FRENCH,        
Major-General, Commanding.
_______________

HEADQUARTERS FRENCH'S DIVISION,        
December 12, 1864.
Capt. W. D. GALE,
        Assistant Adjutant-General:

CAPTAIN: I have the honor to report that no flags were captured from Sears' brigade November 30, 1864.

I am, captain, very respectfully, your obedient servant,
S. G. FRENCH,        
Major-General, Commanding.
_______________

Return of casualties in French's division at the battle of Franklin, Tenn., November 30,1864.

Command.

Killed.

Wounded.

Missing.

Aggregate.

Officers.

Men.

Officers.

Men.

Officers.

Men.

Cockrell's brigade1

19

79

31

198

13

79

419

Sears' brigade

5

25

26

142

1

34

233

Total

24

104

57

340

14

113

652

1 Eighty-two officers and 614 men in fight. The missing from Cockrell’s brigade are known to be prisoners of war (from men who escaped”, captured in the enemy’s works.

The above is the loss from the two brigades, the third one being on duty detached. The loss is over one-third of my troops engaged.

S. G. FRENCH,        
Major-general.
_______________

Report of casualties in French's division December 4, 1864.             

 

Killed.

Wounded.

Aggregate.

Cockrell's brigade.

 

 

 

Sears’ Brigade1

2

19

21

Ector's brigade

1

14

15

Total

3

33

26

1 Colonel Andrews wounded.

Respectfully submitted.
S. G. FRENCH,        
Major-General, Commanding.
_______________

Report of officers and men of Sears' brigade who reached the main line of the enemy's works at Franklin, November 30, 1864.

Names.

Rank.

Co.

Regiment.

Remarks.

James M. Swearingin

Corporal

A

35th Mississippi

 

C. D. Grady

Private

A

do

 

E. T. Eldridge

do

A

do

 

J. L. Conner

First lieutenant

D

do

 

E. S. Holman

Private

D

do

 

J. A. Harrison

Captain

E

do

 

T. B. Walsh

Second lieutenant

E

do

 

J. F. Walsh

First sergeant

E

do

 

F. M. Hester

Sergeant

E

do

 

A.J. Cooper

do

E

do

 

J. H. Rice

Corporal

E

do

 

J. R. Barrett

Private

E

do

 

A. Lowry

do

E

do

 

J. N. Strait

do

E

do

 

H. W. White

do

E

do

 

W. H. Youngblood

Sergeant

F

do

 

J. M. Robinson

Private

F

do

 

A. L. Barnett

Sergeant

I

do

 

J. S. Fox

Private

I

do

 

W. J. Brown

do

I

do

 

J. N. McCoy

First lieutenant

A

35th Mississippi

Reached abatis and wounded.

H. B. Hudnall

Second lieutenant

A

do

Do.

W. F. M. Tate

Corporal

D

do

Do

E. H. Parks

Private

D

do

Reached abatis.

J. A. Killingsworth

do

D

do

Do

J. A. Killingsworth.

Second lieutenant

E

do

Do

A. M. Page

Private

K

do

Do

George Dockery

do

K

do

Do

J. F. Green

do

K

do

Do

G. W. Davis

do

K

do

Do

Isaac Carroll

do

K

do

Do

J. D. Harrington 

do

K

do

Do

Munroe Watson

do

K

do

Wounded three times near interior works.

J. W. Saunders

do

K

do

Reached abatis.

R. Calvert

do

K

do

Do

W.W. Witherspoon.

Colonel

--

36th Mississippi.

Killed near interior works

G. M. Gallaspy

Captain

C

do

 

W.J. Smith

do

F

do

Wounded between works.

P. H. Davis

Lieutenant

A

do

 

J. N. Denson

First sergeant

F

do

 

H. B. Williams

Sergeant

F

do

Wounded between works.

D. F. Pace

Corporal

F

do

 

E.J. Pace

Private

F

do

 

S.S. Braswell

do

F

do

 

M. N. Sojourner

Sergeant

G

do

Wounded between works.

Nicholas Pace

Captain

A

46th Mississippi

 

C. L. Nichols

Private

A

do

 

Isaac Whatley

do

A

do

 

J.T. Duckworth

Lieutenant

B

do

 

W. H. Barnett

 

D

do

 

J. W. Pennington

Sergeant

D

do

 

W. Deavers

Private

D

do

 

J. S. Hill

do

D

do

 

A. Phillips

do

D

do

 

J.C. Phillips

do

D

do

 

J M Ross

do

D

do

 

R. H. Sewell

do

D

do

 

D. Hildebrand

Sergeant

E

do

 

A. Screws

Corporal

E

do

Wounded.

T. P. Wiggins

Captain

F

do

 

W. M. McElroy

Sergeant

F

do

 

J. W. Kittrell 

Private

F

do

 

W. W. Harvey

Sergeant

F

do

Wounded severely at main ditch.

J. A. Epting

Lieutenant

G

do

 

W. Warren

Corporal

G

do

 

A.M. Anderson

do

G

do

 

J. M. Eakin

do

G

do

 

J. Drummond

Private

G

do

Wounded.

S. B. Windham

do

G

do

 

J. B. White

do

H

do

 

T. Burgess

Captain

I

do

Wounded twice severely while near main ditch.

T. A. Florence

Private

K

do

 

M. J. Albritton

Corporal

A

7th Mississippi Battalion.

 

G. D. Hartfield

Captain

B

do

Wounded near second line.

M. Glover

Private

B

do

 

H. Steward

do

B

do

 

W. B. McDonald

do

B

do

 

W. W. Jordan

Corporal

E

do

 

A. J. Thompson

Captain

G

do

Wounded near second line.

W. Carter

Private

F

do

 

J. B. Smith

Sergeant

A

4th Mississippi

Wounded.

W.J. Butler

Private

A

do

 

W. J. Pearson 

do

A

do

 

W. W. Nations

do

A

do

 

Isaac McCafferty

do

A

do

 

G. G. S. Patterson

Corporal

B

do

 

A. J. Strickland

Private

B

do

 

J. T. Thornton

Corporal

B

do

Killed.

W. H. Cook

Private

B

do

Do

W. B. Smith

do

C

do

 

J. J. Graham

do

C

do

 

W. D. Thompson

do

C

do

 

 J. J. Cowey

Corporal

C

4th Mississippi

Killed

L. O. Paris

Captain

D

do

Do

W. H. Patton

Private

D

do

Do

W. H. Sartain

do

D

do

Do

W. E. Brasher

Sergeant

D

do

Wounded.

C. C. Clements

Corporal

D

do

Do

J. W. Stevens

Private

D

do

Do

Wyatt Brasher

Sergeant

D

do

Do

Henry Counts

Private

D

do

Do

W. Counts

do

D

do

Do

M. J. West

Sergeant

D

do

 

C. W. McCain

Private

D

do

 

J.M. Levain

do

D

do

 

O. E. Townsend

Second lieutenant

E

do

 

W. H. Lowriman

Private

E

do

 

John Stafford

do

E

do

 

John Boland

do

E

do

 

L. J. King

do

E

do

 

J. S. Yelington

do

E

do

 

P.S. Webb

do

E

do

 

E. P. Holmes

Sergeant

E

do

Wounded.

John A. Pyron

Private

E

do

Do

W. A. Stafford

do

E

do

 

W. M. Nabors

Sergeant

E

do

 

S.W. King

Corporal

E

do

Wounded.

Samuel Fox

First lieutenant

F

do

 

H. L. Bailey

Sergeant

F

do

 

J. M. Hastings

Private

F

do

 

G. D. Taylor

Sergeant

H

do

Killed.

G. W. Kerr

Corporal

H

do

Wounded.

J. W. Russell

do

H

do

 

R. W. Anderson

Private

H

do

 

W. E. Black

do

H

do

 

Jesse Riddle

do

H

do

 

J. B. Minter

do

H

do

 

H. J. Russell

do

H

do

Wounded.

W. S. Massey

Sergeant

K

do

 

J. E. Bowie

Corporal

K

do

Wounded.

W. S. Dulin

do

K

do

 

A. C. McComb 

do

K

do

Wounded.

T. T. Bates

Private

K

do

Do

J. P. Garner

do

K

do

 

W. H. McComb

do

K

do

 

S. T. L. Ramage

do

K

do

 

E.G. Liles

Captain commanding

--

39th Mississippi.

 

J. F. Newsom

Sergeant

A

do

 

D. J. Drummond

Private

A

do

 

S. M. Brooks

do

A

do

 

H. D. McNease

do

A

do

 

Wm. B. Hemphill

do

A

do

 

S. A. Farmer.

Do

A

do

Killed.

J. S. Donnell

Corporal

B

do

Wounded.

T. Speaks

Private

B

do

Do

W. W. Thacker

Sergeant

B

do

 

G. W. Elliott

First lieutenant

C

do

Wounded.

Tom Waters

Private

C

do

 

D.M. Adams

Sergeant

D

do

Killed.

E. Carleton

Sergeant, acting adjutant

D

do

Slightly wounded twice.

J. S. Ware

Corporal

D

do

Slightly wounded twice.

R. Wilner

Private

D

do

Wounded twice.

J. S. Smith

do

D

do

Do

J. D. Sims

do

D

do

Do

M. Williams

do

D

do

Do

B. Chaney

do

D

do

Do

G. R. Sims

do

D

do

 

M. C. Nichols

do

D

do

 

M. Russell

do

D

do

 

Thomas Parks

do

D

do

 

J. M. Loper

do

D

do

 

R. J. Williams

do

E

do

Wounded.

M. Townsend

Captain

F

do

Killed.

D. J. Grubbs

Private

F

do

Do

William Hutson

Corporal

F

do

 

A. Hutson

Private

F

do

 

J. B. Mahoffy.

do

F

do

 

Joseph B. Garrett

do

F

do

 

E. T. Kersh

Corporal

G

do

 

Jacob D. Kersh

Private

G

39th Mississippi

 

J. P. Hodges

Corporal

I

do

Killed.

J. D. Jones

Private

I

do

Do

R. Crisswell

do

I

do

 

E. Dockery

do

I

do

 Killed.

J. T. Hodges

do

I

do

 

J. Neely

do

I

do

 

W. D. Coney

Second lieutenant

K

do

 

B. F. Elzey

Sergeant

K

do

 


Respectfully submitted.
J. W. BENOIT,        
Assistant Adjutant-General.
NEAR NASHVILLE, TENN., December 14, 1864.
_______________

[ First indorsement.]

Respectfully forwarded.
R. H. SHOTWELL,        
Lieutenant-Colonel, Commanding Brigade.
_______________

[Second indorsement.]

HEADQUARTERS FRENCH'S DIVISION,        
December 14, 1864.
Respectfully transmitted.

These gallant men merit honorable mention; they were foremost amidst the forlorn hope.

C. W. SEARS,        
Brigadier-General Commanding Division.

SOURCE: The War of the Rebellion: A Compilation of the Official Records of the Union and Confederate Armies, Series I, Volume 45, Part 1 (Serial No. 93), p. 714-9