Friday, May 17, 2019

Diary of Captain Luman Harris Tenney: Monday, May 1, 1865

The day at home. Sat for a vignette at Platte's. In evening went with Melissa to Young People's Meeting. Seemed real good and like old times. Am trying to live a higher Christian life. Will try to make Ma and friends happy.

SOURCE: Frances Andrews Tenney, War Diary Of Luman Harris Tenney, p. 162

Diary of Captain Luman Harris Tenney: May 2, 1865

Cloudy in the morning. Went to depot for Minnie Newhall. Spent a part of the day at Minnie's with the girls. The rest of the time at home. Little time to read. Cleveland pictures came.

SOURCE: Frances Andrews Tenney, War Diary Of Luman Harris Tenney, p. 162

Diary of Captain Luman Harris Tenney: May 3, 1865

Cousin Minnie and I stood and sat for pictures. Had a jolly time. Minnie over at our house a portion of the day. Am enjoying my visit with Cousin first rate.

SOURCE: Frances Andrews Tenney, War Diary Of Luman Harris Tenney, p. 162

Diary of Captain Luman Harris Tenney: May 4, 1865

In the morning, aided by the girls, I trimmed up the rose bushes and cleaned around the yard. P. M. we all went over to Minnie's. Uncle Dan telegraphed that he would be along on evening train. Went up to cars. Friends didn't come. Minnie disappointed. Played at chess a good deal.

SOURCE: Frances Andrews Tenney, War Diary Of Luman Harris Tenney, p. 162

Diary of Captain Luman Harris Tenney: May 5, 1865

Uncle Dan, Aunts Roxena and Rhodilla, with the good Cousins Ella and Alonzo, came on morning train. Spent the P. M. at Minnie's. Went with the girls, Minnie and Ella, to Watson's and Platt's to see Carpenter's picture of Lincoln and his cabinet. Had a first rate time at home eating philopenas with the girls.

SOURCE: Frances Andrews Tenney, War Diary Of Luman Harris Tenney, p. 162

Diary of Captain Luman Harris Tenney: May 6, 1865

Newhall friends went yesterday. Has been a very stormy, dreary day. Called at Dr. Steele's. Visited with Aunt Rhodilla and Alonzo. Read some. Got Mrs. Charles' writings. “Cotta Family,” “Early Dawn” and “Kitty Trevellyn's Diary.” Also coarse Testament for mother.

SOURCE: Frances Andrews Tenney, War Diary Of Luman Harris Tenney, p. 162-3

Diary of Captain Luman Harris Tenney: May 7, 1865

Went to Sunday School with Fred and C. G. in Prof. Penfield's class. A stranger from Natchez spoke. Went to church with Aunt Rhodilla, and Melissa. After service Charlie and I walked up R. R. Pleasant time. Have seen a good many friends today.

SOURCE: Frances Andrews Tenney, War Diary Of Luman Harris Tenney, p. 163

Diary of Captain Luman Harris Tenney: May 8, 1865

Left on the 8 A. M. train. Reached Columbus at 2 P. M. Went up to Capitol and ascertained that Nettleton had been commissioned Col. and Seward's commission revoked. Wrote home and to Uncle Albert. Rained. Looked around the city a little.

SOURCE: Frances Andrews Tenney, War Diary Of Luman Harris Tenney, p. 163

Diary of Captain Luman Harris Tenney: May 9, 1865

Went off on the 4:25 A. M. train on Ohio Central. Reached Bellaire at 10:30 A. M. Crossed the river and took the Baltimore & Ohio R. R. Very poor conveniences. Enjoyed the scenery along the Monongahela, Cheat river and Potomac. Slept considerably.

SOURCE: Frances Andrews Tenney, War Diary Of Luman Harris Tenney, p. 163

Diary of Captain Luman Harris Tenney: May 10, 1865

Reached the Relay House at 9 A. M. Saw Rob and Okie McDowell. Reached Washington about noon. Got permission to remain in city till regiment came to Alexandria. Stopped at Markham's.

SOURCE: Frances Andrews Tenney, War Diary Of Luman Harris Tenney, p. 163

Diary of Captain Luman Harris Tenney: Thursday, May 11, 1865

Drew one month's pay on my order. Went through the Patent Office and to the Treasury. Went home with Mr. Mills to tea and remained over night. Rained. Had a very pleasant time with Flint, Lyra and Leof. Capitol yesterday.

SOURCE: Frances Andrews Tenney, War Diary Of Luman Harris Tenney, p. 163

Diary of to Amos A. Lawrence: October 22, 1858

In riding through Roxbury I saw immense placards calling on “the friends of Amos A. Lawrence and Newell A. Thompson” to be present at a great ratification meeting this evening. Such things can do my name no good. I hope they will not result in any harm either to the name or to its owner. No one will suspect me of standing as a candidate this time in the expectation of getting into office.

SOURCE: William Lawrence, Life of Amos A. Lawrence: With Extracts from His Diary and Correspondence, p. 149

Diary of to Amos A. Lawrence: October 28, 1858

Beautiful days. Up to top of Corey's Hill. Not a newspaper nor a public speaker has abused me. One of Mr. Banks's newspapers spoke of me in complimentary terms yesterday.

SOURCE: William Lawrence, Life of Amos A. Lawrence: With Extracts from His Diary and Correspondence, p. 149-50

Diary of to Amos A. Lawrence: December 13, 1858

Rode over to Jamaica Pond early, with my skates in my pocket. Tied my horse to a tree and skated half an hour on the most beautiful surface I ever saw. There was not a mark on the virgin ice, and as I flew over it I was reminded of “angels' wings.” Reached town at nine.

The Salmon Falls Company's account so bad that I have made an offer in writing to the directors through the treasurer to give up commissions enough to make the account up to three per cent, or $30,000.

SOURCE: William Lawrence, Life of Amos A. Lawrence: With Extracts from His Diary and Correspondence, p. 150

Diary of to Amos A. Lawrence: December 25, 1858

Christmas. Once more this delightful day returns, bringing with it the grateful memory of a Saviour's birth, and of his life on earth spent in poverty and suffering that He might bring to us salvation. There are the memories, too, of those who have been dear to us in this world, and who are now, as we trust, enjoying a better life in heaven.

We had spent the evening with the children at Mr. Nathan Appleton's, where were about a hundred persons, young and old, relatives of the family and near friends. St. Nicholas (little Nathan) came in during the dancing, bringing a large basket on his back in which was a pretty present for every one of the young people. Then there was supper, and we returned to the parlors, where Mrs. Appleton arranged an old-fashioned contra-dance and invited me to be her partner, which I accepted. All this kept us up till quarter before eleven. But the children were awake in the morning not less early than usual, feeling for their stockings and admiring their presents.

We went to Sunday-school and church. All were happy and I trust thankful. At five we went to town and dined at Mr. William Appleton's, where there was another gathering in the evening. At ten we left for home, bringing all at one trip, nine inside the carriage and myself riding as footman behind. If their precious lives are spared I would be content to ride always on the outside. May God bless them, and grant that they may never have cause to look back with sorrow on their present days of innocence.

SOURCE: William Lawrence, Life of Amos A. Lawrence: With Extracts from His Diary and Correspondence, p. 150-1

Diary of to Amos A. Lawrence: December 31, 1858

To-day my partnership with Mr. Mason is dissolved after about fifteen years. Walked to town against a driving snowstorm. Stopped at William's house; found him not very well. He is an invalid not unfrequently, and sometimes I have anxiety on his account. But I trust that he will be spared to us. He is very dear to me, as an only brother ought to be. This night, in 1852, my dear, good father went to heaven. God grant that we may follow him whenever our time on this earth shall be ended.

SOURCE: William Lawrence, Life of Amos A. Lawrence: With Extracts from His Diary and Correspondence, p. 151-2

Diary of to Amos A. Lawrence: January 10, 1859

Cold. 14° below zero at my house. Much colder elsewhere, especially in New Hampshire and Vermont. 38 in Montpelier and in some other places. Rode over to Cambridge. Asked a boy about a poor woman who is dying of consumption. He knew her and told me she had been burnt out (of the old Porter Tavern) and was living near. He jumped on my horse and rode him up and down the road while I went in and found the poor woman. She was overjoyed at seeing me, and laughed and cried by turns.

SOURCE: William Lawrence, Life of Amos A. Lawrence: With Extracts from His Diary and Correspondence, p. 152

The Lincoln-Douglas Debates

Ottawa, Illinois
August 21, 1858
Freeport, Illinois
August 27, 1858
Jonesboro, Illinois
September 15, 1858
Charleston, Illinois
September 18, 1858
Galesburg, Illinois,
October 7, 1858
Quincy, Illinois
October 13, 1858
Alton, Illinois
October 15, 1858

Thursday, May 16, 2019

In The Review Queue: The Vicksburg Assaults, May 19-22, 1863


Edited by Steven E. Woodworth
& Charles D. Grear

After a series of victories through Mississippi early in the spring of 1863, General Ulysses S. Grant’s Army of the Tennessee had reached the critical point in its campaign to capture Vicksburg. Taking the city on the hill would allow the Union to control the Mississippi River and would divide the Confederacy in half. Confederate morale was low, and a Union victory in the war appeared close before the start of Grant’s assault against General John C. Pemberton’s Army of Mississippi.
 
But due to difficult terrain, strong defenses, and uncoordinated movements, the quick triumph Grant desired was unattainable. On the afternoon of May 19, with little rest, preparation, or reconnaissance, Union forces charged the Confederate lines only to be repulsed. A respite between the assaults allowed both sides to reinforce their positions. Early on May 22 the Union artillery sought to soften the stronghold’s defenses before the general attack, but despite the Union forces’ preparation, the fighting proved even more disorganized and vicious. Again Grant failed to move Pemberton. Not wanting to risk more soldiers in a third attack, Grant conceded to the necessity of laying siege. Confederate morale climbed as the Southerners realized they had held their ground against an overwhelming force.
 
 Editors Steven E. Woodworth and Charles D. Grear have assembled five captivating essays that examine Grant’s unsuccessful assaults against Confederate defensive lines around Vicksburg. Ranging from military to social history, the essays further historical debates on prominent topics, such as the reactions of Midwesterners to the first failures of Grant’s Vicksburg campaign. Two essays from opposing sides analyze the controversial decisions surrounding the Railroad Redoubt, the site of the bloodiest fighting on May 22. Another investigates how the tenacity of Texan reinforcements forced Union soldiers to abandon their gains.
 
 Peppered with first-hand observations and bolstered by an impressive depth of research, this anthology is an invitingly written account and comprehensive assessment. By zeroing in on the two assaults, the contributors offer essential clarity and understanding of these important events within the larger scope of the Civil War’s Vicksburg Campaign.

List of Essays:
  • Haste and Underestimation: May 19, by J. Parker Hills
  • Failure and Scapegoat: May 22, by J. Parker Hills
  • The Assault on the Frailroad Redoubt, by Steven E. Woodworth
  • Texans in the Breach: Waul’s Legion at Vicksburg, by Brandon Franke
  • “The Worth-West is Determined with the Sword”: Midwesterners’ reactions to the Vicksburg Assaults, by Charles D. Grear
About the Editors

Steven E. Woodworth, a professor of history at Texas Christian University, is the author or editor of more than thirty books, including This Great Struggle: America’s Civil War, Nothing but Victory: The Army of the Tennessee, 1861–1865, and Jefferson Davis and His Generals: The Failure of Confederate Command in the West. He is a coeditor of the Civil War Campaigns in the West series.

Charles D. Grear, a professor of history at Central Texas College, is the author or editor of eight books, including The Tennessee Campaign of 1864, Why Texans Fought in the Civil War, and The House Divided: America in the Era of the Civil War & Reconstruction. He is a coeditor of the Civil War Campaigns in the West series.

ISBN 978-0809337194, Southern Illinois University Press, © 2019, Hardcover, 136 pages, Photographs, Maps, End Notes at the end of each essay & Index. $29.50.  To purchase this book click HERE.

Diary of Corporal David L. Day: October 7, 1861

We were today mustered into the service of the United States, by Captain John M. Goodhue, U. S. A. The company is designated as Company B, and the regiment as the 25th Massachusetts volunteers. I suppose we are now stuck for three years -unless sooner shot.

SOURCE: David L. Day, My Diary of Rambles with the 25th Mass. Volunteer Infantry, p. 6

Diary of Corporal David L. Day: October 8, 1861

COL. UPTON TAKES COMMAND


Col. Upton assumed command of the regiment today, and will at once set about perfecting the organization and discipline. The officers are:

FIELD AND STAFF.

Colonel,
Edwin Upton. Fitchburg.
Lieutenant Colonel,
Augustus Ii. R. Sprague, Worcester.
Major,
Matthew J. Mc Cafferty, Worcester.
Adjutant,
Elijah A. Harkness, Worcester.
Quartermaster,
William O. Brown, Fitchburg.
Surgeon,
J. Marcus Rice, M. D., Worcester.

Company A. Captain, Josiah Picket. Worcester. 1st Lieutenant, Frank E. Goodwin, Worcester. 2d Lieutenant. Merritt B. Bessey, Worcester.

Company B. Captain, Willard Clark, Milford. 1st Lieutenant, William Emery, Milford. 2d Lieutenant, William F. Diaper, Milford.

Company C. Captain, Cornelius G. Atwood. Boston. 1st Lieutenant, James Tucker, Boston. 2d Lieutenant. Merrick F. Prouty, Spencer.

Company D. Captain, Albert F. Foster, Worcester. 1st Lieutenant, George S. Campbell, Worcester. 2d Lieutenant, George H. Spaulding, Worcester.

Company E. Captain. Thomas O'Neill, Worcester. 1st Lieutenant) William Daly, Worcester. 2d Lieutenant, Henry McConville, Worcester.

Company F. Captain, Charles II. Foss. Fitchburg. 1st Lieutenant, Levi Lawrence, Fitchburg. 2d Lieutenant, J. Henry Richardson, Fitchburg.

Company G. Captain, Louis Wagely, Worcester. 1st Lieutenant, Henry M. Rickster, Worcester. 2d Lieutenant, Frederic M. Weigand, Worcester.

Company H. Captain, Orson Moulton, Worcester. 1st Lieutenant, David M. Woodward, Worcester. 2d Lieutenant, Nathaniel H. Foster, North Brookfield.

Company I. Captain. Varanus P. Parkhnrst, Templeton. 1st Lieutenant, James B. Smith, Royalston. 2d Lieutenant, Amos Buffom, Templeton.

Company K. Captain, J. Waldo Denny, Worcester. 1st Lieutenant, Samuel Harrington, Paxton. 2d Lieutenant, James M. Drennan, Worcester.

Most of these officers and many of the enlisted men have done military duty either in the state militia, or as three-months men around Washington. So we are not an entirely green crowd. The officers are a fine looking body of young men, and I think, with a little flattery and catering to their vanity, we shall get along nicely with them.

SOURCE: David L. Day, My Diary of Rambles with the 25th Mass. Volunteer Infantry, p. 6-7

Diary of Corporal David L. Day: October 12, 1861

The boys are settling down to the routine of military duty, and getting accustomed to camp life. They take kindly to discipline, and seem anxious to learn the drill.

PRESENTATIONS.

Presentations are the order of the day. The adjutant has had a horse presented him by his firemen friends. A great, stout, clumsy, good-natured horse. I should think he was better adapted for hauling a fire engine than for a parade horse, but perhaps will answer the purpose well enough.

The major's friends have also presented him with a horse. A good kind of horse enough. Nothing very stylish or dashy about him for a war charger, but perhaps he can smell the battle as far as any horse. The major, in a clever little speech, assured his friends that they would never hear of the nag's striking his best gait to the rear. The major being a man of immense rotundity, I imagine that the horse after carrying him a couple of hours, would feel willing to give boot to go into the ranks rather than remain on the staff.

The Worcester ladies, with commendable patriotism, have presented us with a splendid silk banner (the national colors), and have enjoined us to carry it with us in our wanderings, and return it again to them without dishonor. And we have sworn by a thousand stout hearts and bright bayonets, that that banner shall float above the battlements of secession and be again returned to them, crowned with the laurel wreaths of victory. And when amid the flame and thunder of the battle, we look on its bright folds, remembering its fair donors, rush to victory and glory.

SPECULATIONS.

Our time is being occupied with drills and receiving company, with which we are highly favored and are always glad to see. The boys are having leave of absence, and are visiting their homes preparatory for their departure south. Many are the speculations among the boys as to our destination, but no one seems to know anything about it. I tell them I think we shall go to Dixie.

SELECTING A CHAPLAIN.

After hearing several candidates for the office of chaplain, they have finally settled on Rev. Horace James, pastor of the old South church, Worcester. I think they have shown good judgment in selecting a chaplain of the orthodox faith, as no one visiting our camp for an hour could doubt their belief in the existence of the burning lake by the way they consign each other to that locality.

THE LADIES.

The pretty girls, God bless their souls, are always first and foremost in every good work, and they are now in session at Agricultural Hall, busily at work for the soldiers. They are making repairs and alterations in our uniforms, sewing on chevrons and doing whatever small jobs of needlework we may desire. They have also furnished us with needles, thread, wax, buttons, pincushions, pins and other small articles which we may need. For all of which they will please accept the warmest emotions of grateful hearts.

SOURCE: David L. Day, My Diary of Rambles with the 25th Mass. Volunteer Infantry, p. 7-8

William N. Bilbo of Nashville, Tenn. . . .

. . . Died in that city on the 27th Ult.  He was a man of considerable prominence.  He was ambitious, and a man of Energy; but he was fickle, eccentric, inconsistent of purpose, and hence he achieved but little success in anything he undertook.  He tired law, politics, literature, speculation, mining, &c., but failed in them all, though he had capacity enough to win success in either, if his energies had been properly directed.  He had many amiable qualities, and leaves a wide circle of friends.

— Published in the Montgomery News Advertiser, Montgomery, Alabama, Saturday August 3, 1867, p. 2 and the same article was published in The Weekly Advertiser, Montgomery, Alabama, Tuesday, August 6, 1867, p. 2

Wednesday, May 15, 2019

Diary of John Beauchamp Jones: November 13, 1863

No news of battles yet. But we have a rumor of the burning of the fine government steamer R. E. Lee, chased by the blockaders. That makes two this week.

Gen. Lee dispatched the President, yesterday, as follows:

“Orange C. H., Nov. 12th. — For the last five days we have only received three pounds of corn per horse, from Richmond, per day. We depend on Richmond for corn. At this rate, the horses will die, and cannot do hard work. The enemy is very active, and we must be prepared for hard work any day. — R. E. Lee.”

On the back of which the President indorsed: "Have the forage sent up in preference to anything else. The necessity is so absolute as to call for every possible exertion.—Jefferson Davis."

Perhaps this may rouse the department. Horses starving in the midst of corn-fields ready for gathering! Alas, what mismanagement!

I cut the following from the Dispatch:

Flour. — We heard yesterday of sales of flour at $110 per barrel. We do not, however, give this as the standard price; for, if the article was in market, we believe that even a higher figure would be reached. A few days since a load of flour was sent to an auction-house on Cary Street to be sold at auction. The proprietors of the house very properly declined to receive it, refusing to dispose of breadstuffs under the hammer, where men of money, and destitute of souls, would have an opportunity of buying it up and withdrawing it from market.

corn-meal. — This article is bringing from $18 to $20 per bushel, and scarce at that.

Country Produce And Vegetables. — We give the following as the wholesale rates: Bacon, hoground, $2.75 to $3; lard, $2.25 to $2.30; butter, $3.75 to $4; eggs, $2 to $2.25; Irish potatoes, $7.50 to $8; sweet potatoes, $10.50 to $12; tallow candles, $4 per pound; salt, 45 cents per pound.

groceries. — Coffee — wholesale, $9 per pound, retail, $10; sugar, $2.85 to $3.25; sorghum molasses, wholesale, $10, and $14 to $15 at retail; rice, 30 to 35 cents.

liquors. — Whisky, $55 to $70 per gallon, according to quality, apple brandy, $50; high proof rum, $50; French brandy, $80 to $100.

"In the city markets fresh meats are worth $1.25 to $1.50 for beef and mutton, and $2 for pork; chickens, $6 to $8 per pair; ducks, $7 to $8 per pair; butter, $4.50 to $5 per pound; sweet potatoes, $2.50 per half peck; Irish potatoes, $2 per half peck.

leather. — Sole leather, $6.50 to $7.50 per pound; upper leather, $7.50 to $8; harness leather, $5.50 to $6; hides are quoted at $2.50 to $2.75 for dry, and $1.50 for salted green; tanners' oil, $4 to $5 per gallon.

tobacco. — Common article, not sound, $1 to $1.25; medium, pounds, dark, $1.30 to $2; good medium bright, $2 to $2.75; fine bright, $2 to $4; sweet 5's and 10's scarce and in demand, with an advance."

My friend Capt. Jackson Warner sent me, to-day, two bushels of meal at government price, $5 per bushel. The price in market is $20. Also nine pounds of good beef, and a shank—for which he charged nothing, it being part of a present to him from a butcher.

SOURCE: John Beauchamp Jones, A Rebel War Clerk's Diary at the Confederate States Capital, Volume 2p. 96-7

Captain Charles Wright Wills: July 5, 1864

July 5, 1864.

Can hear no firing this p. m. It seems the Rebels have got across the Chattahoochie. We are about 12 miles from Atlanta. The river will probably trouble us some, but we all think “Pap” will make it before August 1st. Johnston don't dare give us anything like a fair fight. We are all in splendid spirits and the boys have made the woods ring with their Fourth of July cheers, tired as they are. We have lost no men since the charge of the 27th. I have an Atlanta paper, giving an acount of that fight. They say we were all drunk with whisky and fought more like devils than men.

p. m. We have continued our march about four or five miles today. Osterhaus and M. L. Smith are ahead of us, and I think we are on the right of the army again. The 4th Division, 17th Army Corps is engaged one-half mile ahead of us or rather are shooting a little with their big guns. I climbed a tree a half hour ago, and what do you think? — saw Atlanta, and saw it plainly, too. I suppose it is ten miles distant, not more than 12. The country looks about as level as a floor, excepting one-half mountain, to the left of the city, some miles. We seem to be on the last ridge that amounts to anything. We are, I suppose, two and one-half miles from the river at this point, though we hold it farther to the right. Very large columns of smoke were rolling up from different parts of the city. I suppose they were the explosions of foundries, machine shops, etc. Dense clouds of dust can be seen at several points across the river; suppose it means trains or troops moving.

Have seen but few wounded going back to-day. We are laying along some very good rifle pits, occasionally embrasured for artillery, which the 17th Army Corps took this morning. They were not very stoutly defended, though, and the artillery had been moved back. With some pretty lively skirmishing the line has been advanced this evening. Not much loss on our side; saw some one-half dozen ambulance loads only.

SOURCE: Charles Wright Wills, Army Life of an Illinois Soldier, p. 273-4

Captain Charles Wright Wills: July 6, 1864

July 6, 1864.

I went down to our front this evening. Our advanced artillery is yet some 1,200 yards from the Rebels, but there is nothing but an open field between, and it looks quite close. The Johnnies have thrown up a nice fort, embrasured for nine guns. They have not fired a shot to-day. The captain of our advanced artillery told me the Rebels have 20 Parrott guns in the fort, and excellent gunners.

We moved this evening one mile to the left and relieved a portion of the 20th Corps, which went on further to the left.

We started on this campaign with 10 field officers in our brigade and now have but two left. Three killed, three wounded and two left back sick. I hear the Rebel works here are the last this side of the river, and but few hundred yards from it.

SOURCE: Charles Wright Wills, Army Life of an Illinois Soldier, p. 274

Diary of Captain Luman Harris Tenney: April 25, 1865

Early in the morning started for Amherst with the children. Had a pleasant visit at Grandpa's. After dinner, Lissa, Mary, Floy and I went over to cousin Helen's. Tea there. Saw many old friends. Home at 8 P. M.

SOURCE: Frances Andrews Tenney, War Diary Of Luman Harris Tenney, p. 162

Diary of Captain Luman Harris Tenney: April 26, 1865

Spent the day in O. Thought of going to Wellington with Chester but he was out of town. Read most of the day. "Gotta Family" and Atlantic. Some rain.

SOURCE: Frances Andrews Tenney, War Diary Of Luman Harris Tenney, p. 162

Diary of Captain Luman Harris Tenney: April 27, 1865

Melissa and I went to Cleveland. F. D. Allen and C. G. Fairchild out, too. Spent a portion of the day with the boys. Dinner with Will. Called at Uncle Jones' in the evening. Cousin Minnie there. Spent the night with the boys.

SOURCE: Frances Andrews Tenney, War Diary Of Luman Harris Tenney, p. 162

Diary of Captain Luman Harris Tenney: April 28, 1865

Saw the train come in. Commenced to rain early in the day. The procession was grand. Got wet through looking at it. The Bajida and other arrangements were splendid. Very unpleasant day.

SOURCE: Frances Andrews Tenney, War Diary Of Luman Harris Tenney, p. 162

Diary of Captain Luman Harris Tenney: Saturday, April 29, 1865

Yesterday we came home instead of going to Madison, on account of rain. Spent a portion of the day with the boys at Charlie's — dinner. Went up to see Will off. Evening at Mrs. Holtslander's.

SOURCE: Frances Andrews Tenney, War Diary Of Luman Harris Tenney, p. 162

Diary of Captain Luman Harris Tenney: April 30, 1865

Went to Sunday School in the morning with Delos and C. G. Mr. Fitch spoke splendidly. Went to church with Melissa. Mr. Finney preached on “Lasciviousness” — an excellent sermon — A. M. and P. M. Home in the evening.

SOURCE: Frances Andrews Tenney, War Diary Of Luman Harris Tenney, p. 162

Tuesday, May 14, 2019

21st Indiana Independent Battery Light Artillery

Organized at Indianapolis, Ind., and mustered in September 9, 1862. Left State for Covington, Ky., September 9. Attached to 2nd Division, Army of Kentucky, Dept. of the Ohio, October 1862. Unassigned, Army of Kentucky, Dept. of the Ohio, to December, 1862. Artillery, 3rd Division, Army of Kentucky, Dept. of the Ohio, to February, 1863. Crook's Brigade, Baird's Division, Army of Kentucky, Dept. of the Cumberland, to June, 1863. Artillery, 4th Division, 14th Army Corps, Army of the Cumberland, to October, 1863. 2nd Division, Artillery Reserve, Dept. of the Cumberland, to March, 1864. Garrison Artillery, Columbia, Tenn., Dept. of the Cumberland, to November, 1864. Garrison Artillery, Nashville, Tenn., Dept. of the Cumberland, to March, 1865. 2nd Sub-District, District of Middle Tennessee, Dept. of the Cumberland, to June, 1865.

SERVICE. — Duty at Lexington, Richmond, Danville and Louisville, Ky., till February 2, 1863. Ordered to Nashville, Tenn., February 2; thence moved to Cathage, Tenn., and duty there till June. Moved to Murfreesboro June 3. Middle Tennessee (or Tullahoma) Campaign June 23-July 7. Hoover's Gap June 24-26. Occupation of Middle Tennessee till August 16. Passage of the Cumberland Mountains and Tennessee River and Chickamauga (Ga.) Campaign August 16-September 22. Catlett's Gap, Pigeon Mountain, September 15-18. Battle of Chickamauga September 19-21. Siege of Chattanooga, Tenn., September 24-November 23. Battles of Chattanooga November 23-25. Duty at Chattanooga till March 26, 1864, and at Columbia, Tenn., till November 24. Moved to Nashville, Tenn., November 24. Battle of Nashville December 15-16. Garrison duty at Nashville till June, 1865. Mustered out June 26, 1865.

Battery lost during service 4 Enlisted men killed and mortally wounded and 24 Enlisted men by disease. Total 28.

SOURCE: Frederick H. Dyer, A Compendium of the War of the Rebellion, Part 3, p. 1118

22nd Indiana Independent Battery Light Artillery

Organized at Indianapolis, Ind., and mustered in December 15, 1862. Left State for Louisville, Ky., March, 1863. Served unassigned, Army of Kentucky, Dept. of the Ohio, to June, 1863. 1st Brigade, 2nd Division, 23rd Army Corps, Army of Ohio, to August, 1863. Russellsville, Ky., 1st Division, 23rd Army Corps, to December, 1863. District of Southwest Kentucky, 1st Division, 23rd Army Corps, to April, 1864. Camp Burnside, Ky., District of Kentucky, Dept. of the Ohio, to June, 1864. Artillery, 2nd Division, 23rd Army Corps, to November, 1864. Garrison Artillery, Nashville, Tenn., Dept. of the Cumberland, to December, 1864. Artillery, 1st Division, 23rd Army Corps, Army of Ohio, to February, 1865, and Dept. of North Carolina to April, 1865. Artillery, 1st Division, 10th Army Corps, Dept. of North Carolina, to June, 1865.

SERVICE. — Duty at Louisville, Bowling Green and Russellsville, Ky., till December, 1863. Pursuit of Morgan July 2-26, 1863. Moved to Point Burnside, Ky., December, 1863, and duty there till May, 1864. Ordered to Join Army of the Ohio in the field. Atlanta (Ga.) Campaign June 29-September 8. Nickajack Creek July 2-5. Chattahoochie River July 5-17. Decatur July 19. Howard House July 20. Siege of Atlanta JuIy 22-August 25. Utoy Creek August 5-7. Flank movement on Jonesboro August 25-30. Lovejoy Station September 2-6. Pursuit of Hood into Alabama October 1-26. Nashville Campaign November-December. Battle of Franklin November 30. Battle of Nashville December 15-16. Pursuit of Hood to the Tennessee River December 17-28. At Clifton, Tenn., till January 16, 1865. Movement to Washington, D.C., thence to Morehead City, N. C., January 16-February 20. Campaign of the Carolinas March 1-April 26. Advance on Kinston and Goldsboro March 6-21. Battle of Wise's Forks March 8-10. Occupation of Kinston March 14. Occupation of Goldsboro March 21. Advance on Raleigh April 10-14. Occupation of Raleigh April 14. Bennett's House April 26. Surrender of Johnston and his army. Duty in North Carolina till June. Ordered to Indianapolis, Ind., and there mustered out July 7, 1865.

Battery lost during service 1 Officer and 1 Enlisted man killed and 11 Enlisted men by disease. Total 13.

SOURCE: Frederick H. Dyer, A Compendium of the War of the Rebellion, Part 3, p. 1118

23rd Indiana Independent Battery Light Artillery

Organized at Indianapolis, Ind., and mustered in November 8, 1862. On duty at Indianapolis, Ind., guarding Confederate prisoners till July, 1863. Ordered to Louisville, Ky., July 4. Attached to District of Louisville, Ky., Dept. of the Ohio, to September, 1863. Artillery, Willcox's Left Wing forces, 23rd Army Corps, Dept. of the Ohio, to January, 1864. District of the Clinch, Dept. of the Ohio, to April, 1864. Artillery, 1st Division, 23rd Army Corps, Dept. of the Ohio, to August, 1864. Artillery, 3rd Division, 23rd Army Corps, Army of the Ohio, to February, 1865, and Dept. of North Carolina to June, 1865.

SERVICE. — Operations against Morgan in Kentucky July, 1863. Duty at Indianapolis, Ind., till September. Left State for Camp Nelson, Ky., September 16. March to Cumberland Gap September 24-October 3, thence to Morristown October 6-8. March to Greenville and duty there till November 6. Moved to Bull's Gap and duty there till December. March across Clinch Mountain to Clinch River December. Duty in District of the Clinch till April, 1864. Atlanta (Ga.) Campaign May 1-September 8. Demonstrations on Rocky Faced Ridge and Dalton, Ga., May 8-13. Battle of Resaca May 14-15. Operations on line of Pumpkin Vine Creek and battles about Dallas, New Hope Church and Allatoona Hills May 25-June 5. Operations about Marietta and against Kenesaw Mountain June 10-July 2. Lost Mountain June 15-17. Muddy Creek June 17. Assault on Kenesaw June 27. Nickajack Creek July 2-5. Chattahoochie River July 5-17. Siege of Atlanta July 22-August 25. Utoy Creek August 5-7. Flank movement on Jonesboro August 25-30. Lovejoy Station September 2-6. Pursuit of Hood into Alabama October 1-26. Nashville Campaign November-December. Columbia, Duck River, November 24-27. Columbia Ford November 28-29. Battle of Franklin November 30. Battle of Nashville December 15-16. Pursuit of Hood to the Tennessee River December 17-28. At Clifton, Tenn., till January 16, 1865. Movement to Washington, D.C., thence to Fort Fisher, N. C., January 16-February 9. Operations against Hoke February 11-14. Fort Anderson February 18-19. Capture of Wilmington February 22. Campaign of the Carolinas March 1-April 26. Advance on Goldsboro March 6-21. Occupation of Goldsboro March 21. Advance on Raleigh April 10-14. Occupation of Raleigh April 14. Bennett's House April 26. Surrender of Johnston and his army. Duty at Greensboro till June. Mustered out July 2, 1865.

Battery lost during service 2 Enlisted men killed and mortally wounded and 17 Enlisted men by disease. Total 19.

SOURCE: Frederick H. Dyer, A Compendium of the War of the Rebellion, Part 3, p. 1118

24th Indiana Independent Battery Light Artillery

Organized at Indianapolis, Ind., and mustered in November 29, 1862. Left State for Louisville, Ky., March 13, 1863. Attached to District of Western Kentucky, Dept. of the Ohio, to June, 1863. 2nd Brigade, 3rd Division, 23rd Army Corps, Dept. of the Ohio, to August, 1863. 2nd Brigade, 4th Division, 23rd Army Corps, to October, 1863. Artillery Reserve, 23rd Army Corps, to April, 1864. Artillery, 1st Division, 23rd Army Corps, to July, 1864. Artillery, Cavalry Division, 23rd Army Corps, to August, 1864. Artillery, 2nd Division, 23rd Army Corps, to October, 1864. Garrison Artillery, Nashville, Tenn., Dept. of the Cumberland, to January, 1865. Garrison Artillery, Louisville, Ky., to July, 1865.

SERVICE. — Expedition to Monticello and operations in Southeast Kentucky April 25-May 12, 1863. Horse Shoe Bend May 11. Duty at Columbia June 5-22, and at Glasgow till August. Pursuit of Morgan July 1-26. Marrow Bone, Burkesville, July 2. Burnside's Campaign in East Tennessee August 16-October 17. Philadelphia October 20. Knoxville Campaign November 4-December 23. Huff's Ferry November 14. Campbell's Station November 16, Siege of Knoxville November 17-December 5. Duty at Knoxville till April, 1864. March to Charleston April 5-24. Atlanta (Ga.) Campaign May 1 to September 8, 1864. Demonstrations on Rocky Faced Ridge and Dalton May 8-13. Battle of Resaca May 14-15. Operations on line of Pumpkin Vine Creek and battles about Dallas, New Hope Church and Allatoona Hills May 25-June 5. Operations about Marietta and against Kenesaw Mountain June 10-July 2. Lost Mountain June 15-17. Muddy Creek June 17. Assault on Kenesaw June 27. Transferred to Stoneman's Cavalry Division July 1. Nickajack Creek July 2-5. Chattahoochie River July 5-17. Stoneman's Raid to Macon July 27-August 6. Clinton and Macon July 30. Hillsboro, Sunshine Church, July 30-31. Mostly captured. Siege of Atlanta August 6-25. Flank movement on Jonesboro August 25-30. Lovejoy Station September 2-6. Pursuit of Hood into Alabama October 1-26. Garrison duty at Nashville, Tenn., till January, 1865. Battle of Nashville December 15-16. Ordered to Louisville, Ky., January 18, and Post duty there till July 28. Mustered out August 3, 1865.

Battery lost during service 31 Enlisted men by disease.

SOURCE: Frederick H. Dyer, A Compendium of the War of the Rebellion, Part 3, p. 1118-9

25th Indiana Independent Battery Light Artillery

Organized at Indianapolis, Ind., September 4 to November 28, 1864. Left State for Nashville, Tenn., November 28. Attached to Artillery Brigade, 4th Army Corps, Army of the Cumberland, to February, 1865. Unattached Artillery, Dept. of the Cumberland, to March, 1865. Garrison Artillery, Decatur, Ala., to July, 1865.

SERVICE. — Battle of Nashville, Tenn., December 15-16, 1864. Pursuit of Hood to the Tennessee River December 17-28. Duty at Huntsville, Ala., January 4 to February 3, 1865. Moved to Decatur, Ala., February 3, and garrison duty there till July 11. Ordered to Indiana July 11. Mustered out at Indianapolis, Ind., July 20, 1865.

Battery lost during service 1 Enlisted man killed and 6 Enlisted men by disease. Total 7.

SOURCE: Frederick H. Dyer, A Compendium of the War of the Rebellion, Part 3, p. 1119

26th Indiana Independent Battery Light Artillery (a.k.a. Wilder's or Rigby's Independent Battery Light Artillery.)

Organized May, 1861, but not accepted. Mustered in as Company "A," 17th Indiana Infantry, June 12, 1861. Left State for Parkersburg, W. Va., July 2. Attached to Reynolds' Cheat Mountain District, West Virginia, to November, 1861. Milroy's Command, Cheat Mountain, W. Va., to March, 1862. Milroy's Cheat Mountain Brigade, Dept. of the Mountains, to June, 1862. Milroy's Independent Brigade, 1st Army Corps, Army of Virginia, to July, 1862. Piatt's Brigade, Winchester, Va., to August, 1862. Trimble's Brigade, White's Division, Winchester, Va., to September, 1862. Miles' Command, Harper's Ferry, W. Va., September, 1862. Camp Douglas, Ill., and Indianapolis, Ind., to March, 1863. Central District of Kentucky, Dept. of the Ohio, to June, 1863. 2nd Brigade, 1st Division, 23rd Army Corps, Army of the Ohio, to July, 1863. 2nd Brigade, 4th Division, 23rd Army Corps, to August, 1863. Reserve Artillery, 23rd Army Corps, to October, 1863. 2nd Brigade, 3rd Division, 23rd Army Corps, to April, 1864. 2nd Brigade, 4th Division, 23rd Army Corps, to February, 1865. 2nd Brigade, 4th Division, District of East Tennessee, Dept. of the Cumberland, to March, 1865. 1st Brigade, 4th Division, District of East Tennessee, to July, 1865.

SERVICE. — Moved from Parkersburg, W. Va., to Oakland July 23, 1861; thence to Camp Pendleton and duty there till August 7. Moved to Cheat Mountain Pass and Elkwater August 7-13. Operations on Cheat Mountain September 11-17. Petersburg September 11-13. Cheat Mountain Pass September 12. Elkwater September 13. Greenbrier River October 3-4. Expedition to Camp Baldwin December 11-14. Allegheny Mountain December 13. Duty at Beverly till April, 1862. Expedition on the Seneca April 1-12. Monterey April 12. Battle of McDowell May 8. Franklin May 10-12. Strasburg and Staunton Road June 1-2. Battle of Cross Keys June 8. Duty at Winchester till September 1. Defence of Harper's Ferry September 12-15. Bolivar Heights September 14. Surrendered September 15. Paroled and sent to Annapolis, Md., thence to Camp Douglas, Ill.; duty there. At Camp Butler, Springfield, Ill., and at Indianapolis, Ind., till March, 1863. Left State for Lexington, Ky., March 18. Duty in Central District of Kentucky till August. Operations against Pegram March 22-April 1. Action at Danville, Ky., March 24. Hickman's Heights March 28. Dutton's Hill, Monticello, May 1. Burnside's Campaign in East Tennessee August 16-September 17. Carter's Depot September 20-21. Jonesboro September 21. Knoxville Campaign November 4-December 23. Siege of Knoxville November 17-December 5. Garrison duty at Knoxville till March, 1865. Stoneman's Raid through East Tennessee into North Carolina March and April, 1865. Duty at Greenville, East Tennessee, till July. Mustered out July 19, 1865.

Battery lost during service 1 Officer and 12 Enlisted men by disease. Total 13.

SOURCE: Frederick H. Dyer, A Compendium of the War of the Rebellion, Part 3, p. 1119

Diary of John Beauchamp Jones: November 10, 1863

It is supposed our loss in the surprise on Saturday did not exceed 1500, killed, wounded, and taken. It is thought that a battle will occur immediately, if it be not already in progress.

There is no news of moment from any quarter, except the loss of our steamer Cornubia, taken by the blockaders at Wilmington. She was laden with government stores. For months nearly all ships with arms or ammunition have been taken, while those having merchandise on board get in safely. These bribe their way through!

Col. Gorgas gave notice to-day that our supply of saltpeter will be exhausted in January, unless we can import a large quantity.

Another blue day!

SOURCE: John Beauchamp Jones, A Rebel War Clerk's Diary at the Confederate States Capital, Volume 2p. 94

Diary of John Beauchamp Jones: November 11, 1863

No news. I saw, to-day, Gen. Lee's letter of the 7th instant, simply announcing the capture of Hoke's and Haye's brigades. They were on the north side of the river, guarding the pont de tete. There is no excuse, no palliation. He said it was likely Meade's entire army would cross. This had been sent by the Secretary to the President, who indorsed upon it as follows: “If it be possible to reinforce, it should be done promptly. Can any militia or local defense men be made available? — J. D.”

Gen. Whiting writes that he has refused to permit Mr. Crenshaw's correspondence with Collie & Co. to pass uninspected, from a knowledge of the nature of previous correspondence seen by him.

The Northern papers state that Mr. Seward has authorized them to publish the fact that the French Government has seized the Confederate rams building in the ports of France.

I have written Custis Lee, the President's aid, that but one alternative now remains: for the President, or some one else, to assume all power, temporarily, and crush the speculators. This I think is the only chance of independence. I may be mistaken— but we shall see.

Capt. Warner, who feeds the 13,000 prisoners here, when he has the means of doing so, says Col. Northrop, the Commissary, does not respond to his requisitions for meat. He fears the prisoners will take or destroy the city, and talks of sending his family out of it.

I condemned the reign of martial law in this city, in 1862, as it was not then necessary, and because its execution was intrusted to improper and obnoxious men. But now I am inclined to think it necessary not only here, but everywhere in the Confederacy. Many farmers refuse to get out their grain, or to sell their meat, because they say they have enough Confederate money! money for the redemption of which their last negro and last acre are responsible. So, if they be permitted to maintain this position, neither the army nor the non-producing class of the population can be subsisted; and, of course, all classes must be involved in a common ruin. A Dictator might prevent the people from destroying themselves, and it seems that nothing short of extreme measures can prevent it. But, again, suppose the Federal Government were to propose a sweeping amnesty, and exemption from confiscation to all who should subscribe to a reconstruction of the Union — and this, too, at a time of suffering and despondency — and so large a body were to embrace the terms as to render a prolongation of the war impracticable? What would the money the farmers now possess be worth? And what would become of the slaves, especially in Virginia, Tennessee, Kentucky, and Missouri?

SOURCE: John Beauchamp Jones, A Rebel War Clerk's Diary at the Confederate States Capital, Volume 2p. 94-5

Monday, May 13, 2019

Diary of John Beauchamp Jones: November 12, 1863

No accounts of any fighting, but plenty of battles looked for.

A. A. Little writes to the Secretary of War from Fredericksburg, that the attempt to remove the iron from the Aquia Railroad by the government having failed, now is the time for private enterprise to effect it. If the Secretary “will say the word,” it can be done. He says the iron is worth “millions, its weight in gold!” Will Mr. Seddon let it be saved? Yes, indeed.

Mr. Heyliger, agent at Nassau, writes on the 3d instant (just a week ago), that he is shipping bacon by every steamer (three or four per week), leather, percussion caps, and a large amount of quartermaster's stores. But the supply of lead and saltpeter is exhausted, and he hopes the agents in Europe will soon send more. About one in every four steamers is captured by the enemy. We can afford that.

The President sent over to-day, for the perusal of the Secretary of War, a long letter from Gen. Howell Cobb, dated at Atlanta, on the 7th instant. He had just returned from a visit to Bragg's army, and reports that there is a better feeling among the officers for Gen. Bragg, who is regaining their confidence. However, he says it is to be wished that more cordiality subsisted between Generals Bragg and ———, his ——— in command. He thinks Generals B—— and C—— might be relieved without detriment to the service, if they cannot be reconciled to Bragg. He hints at some important movement, and suggests co-operation from Virginia by a demonstration in East Tennessee.

It is generally believed that France has followed the example of England, by seizing our rams. Thus the whole world seems combined against us. And Mr. Seward has made a speech, breathing fire and destruction unless we submit to Lincoln as our President. He says he was fairly elected President for four years of the whole United States, and there can be no peace until he is President of all the States, to which he is justly entitled. A war for the President!

SOURCE: John Beauchamp Jones, A Rebel War Clerk's Diary at the Confederate States Capital, Volume 2p. 95-6

Captain Charles Wright Wills: June 30, 1864 — 8 a.m.

June 30, 1864 8 a. m.

There was a terrific fight on our right, commencing at 2 this morning and lasting until 3. I have not yet heard what it was.

Some deserters passed us this morning. I have lost just half the men I left Scottsboro with just two months ago, but what I have left, are every man ready to help. We have a good deal more than "cleared" ourselves. I had my canteen strap cut off by a bullet and a spent glancing ball struck my ankle.

SOURCE: Charles Wright Wills, Army Life of an Illinois Soldier, p. 271

Captain Charles Wright Wills: July 1, 1864

July 1, 1864.

This campaign is coming down to a question of muscle and nerve. It is the 62d day for us, over 50 of which we have passed under fire. I don't know anything more exhausting. One consolation is that the Rebels are a good deal worse off than we are. They have lost more men in battle, their deserters count by thousands, and their sick far exceed ours. We'll wear them out yet. Our army has been reinforced by fully as many as we have lost in action, so that our loss will not exceed our sick. You notice in the papers acounts of Hooker's charging “Lost Mountain,” taking a large number of prisoners, and the names of officers. You see they are all from the 31st and 40th Alabama. It is also credited to Blair's 17th Corps. Our brigade took all those officers on the 15th of June. I wrote you an account of it then. It hurts us some to see it credited to other troops, but such is the fortune of war, and soldiers who do not keep a reporter must expect it. Colonel Wright starts for home to-day.

SOURCE: Charles Wright Wills, Army Life of an Illinois Soldier, p. 272

Captain Charles Wright Wills: July 2, 1864

July 2, 1864.

We have been taking it easy since the charge. Our shells keep the Rebels stirred up all the time. Sham attacks are also got up twice or three times a day, which must annoy them very much.

SOURCE: Charles Wright Wills, Army Life of an Illinois Soldier, p. 272

Captain Charles Wright Wills: July 3, 1864

July 3, 1864.

Rebels all gone this morning. Our boys were on the mountains at daylight. Hundreds of deserters have come in. Osterhaus moved around the left of the mountain to Marietta, all the rest of the army went to the right of it. We are about one-half a mile from town; have not been in. All who have, say it is the prettiest place we have seen South. Some artillery firing has been heard this p. m. five or six miles south, and there are rumors that an advance has captured a large number of prisoners, but nothing reliable.

SOURCE: Charles Wright Wills, Army Life of an Illinois Soldier, p. 272

Captain Charles Wright Wills: July 4, 1864

July 4, 1864.

I count it the hardest Fourth I have seen in the service. About 8 a. m. we moved out, passed through Marietta, which is by far the prettiest town I have seen South (about the size of Canton), and continued south nearly all the way along our line of works. Marched about 11 miles. Not more than one-third of the men stacked arms when we halted for the night; fell out along the roads. I have seen more than 1,000 prisoners and deserters.

SOURCE: Charles Wright Wills, Army Life of an Illinois Soldier, p. 273

Diary of Captain Luman Harris Tenney: April 17, 1865

Rode all night with paroled prisoners — Yankees. Cold. Reached City Point at 8 A. M. Got ready to leave on the mail boat at 10 A. M. Boat loaded mostly with Southern officers and a few Yankees, few citizens. Saw a telegraph operator with whom I was acquainted in Tenn. Read late papers. Accounts of the assassination. A little seasick. Most of the rebels seem submissive and willing to come under the old flag again.

SOURCE: Frances Andrews Tenney, War Diary Of Luman Harris Tenney, p. 161

Diary of Captain Luman Harris Tenney: April 18, 1865

Had a very good night's rest. Up early. Pleasant visit with an Indiana man. Several Southern ladies on board the boat. Great gloom in Washington. Excitement very high. Went to White House and viewed the President's remains in state. Everybody on the alert to discover the conspirators. Drew pay for January and February. Took the evening train via Harrisburg. Read papers and slept. The whole nation in mourning. All business places draped.

SOURCE: Frances Andrews Tenney, War Diary Of Luman Harris Tenney, p. 161

Diary of Captain Luman Harris Tenney: April 19, 1865

Reached Pittsburg at 2 P. M. Left on Cleveland train at 3. Pittsburg in mourning. Rode in company with a Cleveland man, Briggs, I believe. Pleasant visit. Gave me a detail of the working of the carrier P. O. system. Passed through Cleveland at 10 P. M. Stayed over at Grafton. The funeral of the President took place today. Ceremonies throughout the Union. Johnson bound to deal roughly with traitors.

SOURCE: Frances Andrews Tenney, War Diary Of Luman Harris Tenney, p. 161

Diary of Captain Luman Harris Tenney: April 20, 1865

Rainy. Reached home on the morning train. Met my good mother at the door. It seemed so good. She seemed perfectly resigned to the loss of Theodore. Never was more happy in my life. Ma and I went down to see Minnie and Melissa. Happy meeting. Beautiful little baby Bertie. Carrie a little angel, good and beautiful. Now could I only see Fannie and be reconciled as of old my happiness would be complete.

SOURCE: Frances Andrews Tenney, War Diary Of Luman Harris Tenney, p. 161

Diary of Captain Luman Harris Tenney: April 21, 1865

Ate supper yesterday with Minnie. Spent the morning playing with Carrie and reading. Afternoon Minnie and John over to tea. Went up town with Melissa. Fannie in Bellevue teaching. Fortunate for me. Rode out with Charlie. Took Carrie along. Tea at Minnie's. Music from Joe and John. Fisher and Allie Norton there.

SOURCE: Frances Andrews Tenney, War Diary Of Luman Harris Tenney, p. 161

Diary of Captain Luman Harris Tenney: April 22, 1865

Went to town in the morning to market. Will Hudson came out. We boys got together and had a jolly time. Floy and George came out. Good visit. Chester came home. Walked with Will to the river, too late for train. A lame stiff neck. Spent a part of evening at Minnie's. Saw the Hudson family. F. Henderson and Will Keep. Hurrah!

SOURCE: Frances Andrews Tenney, War Diary Of Luman Harris Tenney, p. 161

Diary of Captain Luman Harris Tenney: April 23, 1865

Was unable to get out on account of my neck. Read Thede's diaries to Ma and Melissa, and talked about him. Minnie in a short time. Read Atlantic. Melissa went to church in P. M. Played with Carrie. Quite a wintry day. Prof. Peck very kind to the family.

SOURCE: Frances Andrews Tenney, War Diary Of Luman Harris Tenney, p. 161

Diary of Captain Luman Harris Tenney: April 24, 1865

Spent the morning at home. In the P. M. went with the girls to Monthly Rhetoricals. Charley Fairchild had an exercise entitled, "One Year with Red Tape." Good. After his exercise we walked about town.

SOURCE: Frances Andrews Tenney, War Diary Of Luman Harris Tenney, p. 161

16th Indiana Independent Battery Light Artillery

Organized at Lafayette, Ind., and mustered in at Indianapolis, Ind., March 24, 1862. Left State for Washington, D.C., June 1. Duty at Capital Hill till June 26. Attached to Military District of Washington, D. C., June, 1862. Artillery, 2nd Army Corps, Army of Virginia, to September, 1862. Artillery, 2nd Division, 12th Army Corps, Army of the Potomac, to October, 1862. Artillery, 2nd Brigade, Defences North of the Potomac, Defences of Washington, D.C., to February, 1863. Fort Washington, Defences of Washington, North of the Potomac, 22nd Army Corps, to May, 1864. 2nd Brigade, DeRussy's Division, 22nd Army Corps, to July, 1864. 3rd Brigade, DeRussy's Division, 22nd Army Corps, to December, 1864. 1st Brigade, DeRussy's Division, 22nd Army Corps, to July, 1865.

SERVICE. — Ordered to join Banks in the Shenandoah Valley June 26, 1862. Pope's Campaign in Northern Virginia July to September. Battle of Cedar Mountain August 9. Fords of the Rappahannock August 21-23. Battles of Groveton August 29 and Bull Run August 30. Maryland Campaign September 6-22. Battle of Antietam, Md., September 16-17 (Reserve). Ordered to Washington, D.C., and duty in the Defences of that city North and South of the Potomac till June, 1865. Repulse of Early's attack on Washington July 11-12, 1864. Ordered to Indianapolis, Ind., June, 1865, and there mustered out July 5, 1865.
Battery lost during service 11 Enlisted men by disease.

SOURCE: Frederick H. Dyer, A Compendium of the War of the Rebellion, Part 3, p. 1116

17th Indiana Independent Battery Light Artillery

Organized at Indianapolis, Ind., and mustered in May 20, 1862. Left State for Baltimore, Md., July 5, 1862. Attached to Defences of Baltimore, Md., 8th Army Corps, Middle Department, to January, 1863. Defences, Upper Potomac, 8th Army Corps, to March, 1863. 1st Brigade, 1st Division, 8th Army Corps, to June, 1863. Maryland Brigade, French's Command, 8th Army Corps, to July. 2nd Brigade, Maryland Heights Division, Dept. of West Virginia, July, 1863. 1st Brigade, Maryland Heights Division, West Virginia, to December, 1863. 1st Brigade, 1st Division, West Virginia, to January, 1864. Wheaton's Brigade, 1st Division, West Virginia, to April, 1864. Reserve Division, Harper's Ferry, W. Va., to August, 1864. Reserve Artillery, 19th Army Corps, Army of the Shenandoah, Middle Military Division, to October, 1864. Garrison Artillery, Frederick City, Md., and Winchester, Va., to December, 1864. Artillery Brigade, 19th Army Corps, Army of the Shenandoah, to March 1865. Artillery Reserve, Army of the Shenandoah, to July, 1865.

SERVICE. — Garrison duty at Baltimore, Md., July 7 to December 27, 1862. Moved to Harper's Ferry, W. Va., December 27, and garrison duty there till July, 1863. Evacuation of Harper's Ferry July 1, 1863. Reoccupation of Harper's Ferry and Maryland Heights July 7, 1863, and garrison duty there till July, 1864. Action at Berryville, Va., October 18, 1863. Well's Demonstration from Harper's Ferry December 10-24, 1863. Sheridan's Shenandoah Valley Campaign August 7-November 28, 1864. Battle of Opequan, Winchester, September 19. Strasburg September 21. Fisher's Hill September 22. Battle of Cedar Creek October 19. Garrison duty at Frederick City, Md., and at Winchester, Va., till June 19, 1865. Ordered to Indianapolis, Ind., June 19, and there mustered out July 8, 1865.

Battery lost during service 4 Enlisted men killed and mortally wounded and 2 Officers and 10 Enlisted men by disease. Total 16.

SOURCE: Frederick H. Dyer, A Compendium of the War of the Rebellion, Part 3, p. 1116

18th Indiana Independent Battery Light Artillery

Organized at Indianapolis, Ind., and mustered in August 20, 1862. Ordered to Louisville, Ky., September. Attached to Artillery, 12th Division, Army of the Ohio, to November, 1862. Artillery, 5th Division (Center), 14th Army Corps, Army of the Cumberland, to January, 1863. Artillery, 5th Division, 14th Army Corps, Army of the Cumberland, to June, 1863. Artillery, 4th Division, 14th Army Corps, June, 1863. Artillery, Wilder's Mounted Brigade, Army of the Cumberland, to November, 1863. 3rd Brigade, 2nd Cavalry Division, Army of the Cumberland, to January, 1864. Artillery, 1st Cavalry Division, Army of the Cumberland, to October, 1864. Artillery, 1st Division, Wilson's Cavalry Corps, Military Division, Mississippi, to June, 1865.

SERVICE. — Campaign against Bragg in Kentucky October 3-26, 1862. March to Bowling Green, Ky., October 26-November 3, thence to Scottsboro, Ky., and Gallatin, Tenn., November 11-26. Pursuit of Morgan December 22, 1862-January 2, 1863. Moved to Murfreesboro, Tenn., January 2-8, 1863, and duty there till June. Expedition to Auburn, Liberty and Alexandria February 3-5. Expedition to Woodbury March 3-8. Expedition to Lebanon, Carthage and Liberty April 1-8. Expedition to McMinnville April 20-30. Middle Tennessee (or Tullahoma) Campaign June 23-July 7. Hoover's Gap June 24-26. Occupation of Middle Tennessee till August 16. Passage of the Cumberland Mountains and Tennessee River and Chickamauga (Ga.) Campaign August 16-September 22. Bombardment of Chattanooga August 21. Ringgold, Ga., September 11. Lee and Gordon's Mills September 11. Leet's Tan Yard or Rock Springs September 12-13. Alexander's and Reed's Bridges September 17. Battle of Chickamauga September 19-21. Operations against Wheeler and Roddy September 30-October 17. Hill's Gap, Thompson's Cove, near Beersheba, October 3. Murfreesboro Road October 4. McMinnville October 4-5. Farmington October 7. Moved to Huntsville, Ala., and duty there till November. Moved to relief of Knoxville, Tenn., November 28-December 8. Dandridge December 24. Operations about Dandridge and Mossy Creek December 24-28. Mossy Creek Station December 26. Talbot's Station December 28. Mossy Creek, Talbot's Station, December 29. Operations about Dandridge January 16-17, 1864. Bend of Chucky River, near Dandridge, January 16. Dandridge January 17. Operations about Dandridge January 26-28. Near Fair Garden January 27. Atlanta (Ga.) Campaign May 1-September 8. Demonstrations on Dalton, Ga., May 9-13. Tilton May 13. Battle of Resaca May 14-15. Cassville May 19. Statesborough May 23. Burnt Hickory May 24. Battles about Dallas, New Hope Church and Allatoona Hills May 25-June 5. Ackworth June 8. Operations about Marietta and against Kenesaw Mountain June 10-July 2. Lost Mountain June 15-17. Assault on Kenesaw June 27. Chattahoochie River July 5-17. Siege of Atlanta July 22-August 25. McCook's Raid on Atlanta & West Point R. R. July 27-31. Lovejoy Station July 29. Newnan's July 30-31. Flank movement on Jonesboro August 25-30. Pursuit of Wheeler September 24-October 18. Ordered to Louisville, Ky., and duty there refitting till December. Pursuit of Lyons from Paris, Ky., to Hopkinsville, Ky., December 8-January 15, 1865. Hopkinsville, Ky., December 16, 1864. Moved to Nashville, Tenn. Duty there till February 1865, and at Waterloo, Ala., till March. Wilson's Raid to Macon, Ga., March 22-April 24. Selma, Ala., April 2. Montgomery April 12. Fort Tyler, West Point, April 16. Capture of Macon April 20. Duty at Macon, Chattanooga and Nashville till June. Mustered out June 23, 1865.

Battery lost during service 1 Officer and 11 Enlisted men killed and mortally wounded and 31 Enlisted men by disease. Total 43.

SOURCE: Frederick H. Dyer, A Compendium of the War of the Rebellion, Part 3, p. 1116-7

19th Indiana Independent Battery Light Artillery

Organized at Indianapolis, Ind., and mustered in August 5, 1862. Ordered to Louisville, Ky., and attached to 34th Brigade, 10th Division, Army of the  Ohio, September, 1862. 34th Brigade, 10th Division, 1st Army Corps, Army of Ohio, to November, 1862. Artillery, 5th Division (Center), 14th Army Corps, Army of the Cumberland, to January, 1863. Artillery, 5th Division, 14th Army Corps, Army of the Cumberland, to June, 1863. Artillery, 4th Division, 14th Army Corps, to October, 1863. Artillery, 3rd Division, 14th Army Corps, to July, 1864. Artillery Brigade, 14th Army Corps, to June, 1865.

SERVICE. — Pursuit of Bragg into Kentucky October 1-15, 1862. Battle of Perryville, Ky., October 8. March to Lebanon and Woodsonville October 16-28, and duty there till December. Operations against Morgan, in Kentucky, December 22, 1862-January 2, 1863. March to Nashville, Tenn., thence to Murfreesboro, Tenn., January, 1863, and duty there till June. Expedition to Auburn, Liberty and Alexandria February 3-5. Expedition to Woodbury March 3-8. Action at Vaught's Hill, near Woodbury, March 20. Expedition to Lebanon, Carthage and Liberty April 1-8. Expedition to McMinnville April 20-30. Middle Tennessee (or Tullahoma) Campaign June 23-July 7. Hoover's Gap June 24-26. Occupation of Middle Tennessee till August 16. Passage of the Cumberland Mountains and Tennessee River and Chickamauga (Ga.) Campaign August 16-September 22. Shellmound August 21. Narrows, near Shellmound, August 28. Reconnoissance toward Chattanooga August 30-31. Battle of Chickamauga, Ga., September 19-21. Siege of Chattanooga September 24-November 23. Chattanooga-Ringgold Campaign November 23-27. Battles of Orchard Knob November 23-24. Mission Ridge November 25. Demonstrations on Dalton, Ga., February 22-27, 1864. Tunnel Hill, Buzzard's Roost Gap and Rocky Faced Ridge February 23-25. Atlanta (Ga.) Campaign May 1 to September 8. Demonstrations on Rocky Faced Ridge May 8-11. Battle of Resaca May 14-15. Advance on Dallas May 18-25. Operations on Pumpkin Vine Creek and battles about Dallas, New Hope Church and Allatoona Hills May 25-June 5. Ackworth June 2. Operations about Marietta and against Kenesaw Mountain June 10-July 2. Pine Hill June 11-14. Lost Mountain June 15-17. Assault on Kenesaw June 27. Ruff's Station July 4. Chattahoochie River July 5-17. Peach Tree Creek July 19-20. Siege of Atlanta July 22-August 25. Utoy Creek August 5-7. Flank movement on Jonesboro August 25-30. Battle of Jonesboro August 31-September 1. Operations against Hood in North Georgia and North Alabama September 29-November 3. March to the sea November 15-December 10. Siege of Savannah December 10-21. Campaign of the Carolinas January to April, 1885. Fayetteville, N. C., March 11. Taylor's Hole Creek, Averysboro, March 16. Battle of Bentonville March 19-21. Occupation of Goldsboro March 24. Advance on Raleigh April 10-14. Occupation of Raleigh April 14. Bennett's House April 26. Surrender of Johnston and his army. March to Washington, D.C., via Richmond, Va., April 29-May 19. Grand Review May 24. Mustered out June 10, 1865.

Battery lost during service 1 Officer and 10 Enlisted men killed and mortally wounded and 21 Enlisted men by disease. Total 32.

SOURCE: Frederick H. Dyer, A Compendium of the War of the Rebellion, Part 3, p. 1117

20th Indiana Independent Battery Light Artillery

Organized at Indianapolis, Ind., and mustered in September 19, 1862. Left State for Henderson, Ky., December 17, 1862. Attached to District of Western Kentucky, Dept. of the Ohio, to May, 1863. Post and District of Nashville, Tenn., Dept. of the Cumberland, to January, 1864. Artillery, 1st Division, 11th Army Corps, Army of the Cumberland, to April, 1864. Unattached, 4th Division, 20th Army Corps, Dept. of the Cumberland, to July, 1864. Artillery Brigade, 14th Army Corps, Army of the Cumberland, to November, 1864. Artillery, Provisional Division, District of the Etowah, Dept. of the Cumberland, to January, 1865. Garrison Artillery, Chattanooga, Tenn., Dept. of the Cumberland, to June, 1865.

SERVICE. — Duty at Henderson Ky., and in the District of Western Kentucky till May, 1863. Ordered to Nashville, Tenn., and duty there till October 5, 1863. Refitted and assigned to guard duty along Nashville & Chattanooga R. R. till March 5, 1864. Moved to Bridgeport, Ala., March 5, and garrison duty there till July. Ordered to the field and Joined 14th Army Corps, Army of the Cumberland, south of the Chattahoochie River, Georgia. Siege of Atlanta July 22-August 25. Flank movement on Jonesboro August 25-30. Battle of Jonesboro August 31-September 1. Pursuit of Hood into Alabama October 1-26. Action near Atlanta October 30. Moved to Chattanooga, Tenn., November 5, thence to Nashville, Tenn. Battles of Nashville December 15-16. Duty at Courtland, Ala., and Chattanooga, Tenn., till June, 1865. Mustered out June 28, 1865.

Battery lost during service 7 Enlisted men killed and mortally wounded and 24 Enlisted men by disease. Total 25.

SOURCE: Frederick H. Dyer, A Compendium of the War of the Rebellion, Part 3, p. 1117-8

Official Reports of the Campaign in North Alabama and Middle Tennessee, November 14, 1864 — January 23, 1865: No. 150. Report of Maj. Modesta J. Green, Eleventh Missouri Infantry, of operations December 15-16, 1864.

No. 150.

Report of Maj. Modesta J. Green, Eleventh Missouri Infantry,
of operations December 15-16, 1864.


HDQRS. ELEVENTH MISSOURI VETERAN INFANTRY,      
In the Field, December 21, 1864.

SIR: I have the honor to make the following report of the part taken by the Eleventh Missouri Veteran Infantry in the late battles near Nashville, Tenn.:

On the morning of December 15 the regiment, with the brigade, left camp near Nashville, and made a reconnaissance to the right and front, skirmishing with the enemy on the Charlotte pike, then passed to the left, taking position in line of battle in front of our former position. From here we advanced in support of Captain Reed's (Second Iowa) battery until the order was received to charge the rebel fort. The charge was made in handsome style. Company E, commanded by Captain Notestine, being in the advance, in line of skirmishers, were the first to enter the fort. (Captain Notestine was afterward badly wounded and had a leg amputated.) The regiment continued to advance until the second fort was taken by the cavalry and other troops on the right. Here we were allowed to rest a few moments, when we again moved forward. After advancing a short distance we came upon the enemy in line of battle on a hill; here another charge was made, in which the rebels were completely routed, and driven in perfect confusion a distance of three-quarters of a mile, officers and men behaving most gallantly, capturing many prisoners. Night coming on we were ordered to halt and remained in line of battle during the night, throwing up temporary earth-works.

The order to advance was given at an early hour on the morning of the 16th, and the regiment, together with the brigade to which it belongs, advanced in line of battle across an open field, but soon discovered that the enemy were strongly posted on the opposite side of the field behind formidable breast-works. After advancing about a half a mile under a heavy fire from the rebel skirmishers and sharpshooters, we came within range of the enemy's fire from their line of works and were ordered to halt and remain in line of battle. After remaining here a short time the regiment was ordered to change its position and form in rear of the Fifth Minnesota. In making this move the regiment lost several men killed and wounded, being exposed to a severe fire from the entire rebel front. It was in making this move that our gallant leader, Lieutenant-Colonel Bowyer, received a severe wound in the arm while directing the movements of the regiment. We remained in this position until about 3 p.m., when the order was given to charge the rebel works. The order was no sooner given than the regiment started at a double-quick, charging through the open field for a distance of about 600 yards, under a most galling fire from the enemy. On reaching the works many prisoners were captured in the trenches, and many others either shot or captured while attempting to escape. A rebel battery of four guns was also captured here by the brigade, for which the Eleventh Missouri would respectfully claim, with the gallant brigade commander, its share of the honor. Two rebel flags were also captured by the regiment, one by Lieutenant Simmons* and the other by Corporal Parks,* color guard. In making the charge the colors of the regiment were three times shot down, having one color-bearer killed and two wounded. The flag-staff was shot into three pieces by a rebel shell. After the enemy were driven from their works we continued in pursuit for a distance of about one mile, driving them in the wildest confusion and capturing many prisoners, when we were ordered by the brigade commander to halt and join the brigade, which was forming a short distance in the rear. Here we remained until the morning of the 17th, when it was ascertained that the enemy were retreating, and we were ordered, with other troops, to follow in the pursuit.

The losses in the regiment in the two days' fighting are 4 men killed and 83 wounded, including 10 commissioned officers.

During the fight every officer and man behaved with commendable coolness and bravery. No especial mention can be made of individual acts of courage or bravery, as every officer and man behaved in the most praiseworthy manner.

M. J. GREEN,                       
Major, Commanding Regiment.
 Lieut. T. P. GERE,
Acting Assistant Adjutant General.
_______________

ADDENDA.

HDQRS. ELEVENTH MISSOURI VETERAN INFANTRY,      
 Eastport, Miss., January 20, 1865.
Maj. J. HOUGH,
Assistant Adjutant-General, Detach. Army of the Tennessee:

SIR: I have the honor to respectfully submit the following statement in regard to the rebel flag captured by Lieut. William T. Simmons,* Eleventh Missouri Infantry, at the battle near Nashville, Tenn., December 16, 1864:

The flag belonged to the Thirty-fourth Alabama Infantry, and was being borne off by the rebel color-bearer at the time our forces entered the rebel intrenchments. He was ordered by Lieutenant Simmons to halt and surrender; refusing to do so, he was told he would be shot if he did riot, when he surrendered the flag to the above-named officer.

I am, very respectfully, your obedient servant,
M. J. GREEN,                       
Major, Commanding Eleventh Missouri Infantry.
_______________

HDQRS. ELEVENTH MISSOURI VETERAN INFANTRY,      
Eastport, Miss., January 21, 1865.
 Maj. J. HOUGH,
Assistant Adjutant-General, Detach. Army of the Tennessee:

SIR: I have the honor to respectfully submit the following statement in regard to the rebel flag captured by Private G. W. Welch,* Company A, Eleventh Missouri Infantry, in the battle near Nashville, Tenn., December 16, 1864:

The flag was being borne off the field as the enemy were retreating from their works, when the rebel color-bearer was struck by a shot from our lines, and the colors captured by the above-named man. It is not known to what regiment they belonged.

I am, very respectfully, your obedient servant,
M. J. GREEN,                       
Major, Commanding Eleventh Missouri Infantry.
_______________

HDQRS. ELEVENTH MISSOURI VETERAN INFANTRY,      
Eastport, Miss., January 21, 1865.
 Maj. J. HOUGH,
Assistant Adjutant-General, Detach. Army of the Tennessee:

SIR: I have the honor to respectfully submit the following statement in regard to the rebel flag captured by Private James W. Parks,* Company F, Eleventh Missouri Infantry, at the battle near Nashville, Tenn., December 16, 1864:

The flag was captured in the enemy's line of intrenchments. The rebel color-bearer having been wounded by a shot from our lines, the colors were captured by the above-named soldier. It is not known to what regiment the flag belonged.

I am, very respectfully, your obedient servant,
M. J. GREEN,                       
Major, Commanding Eleventh Missouri Infantry.
_______________

* Awarded the Medal of Honor.

SOURCE: The War of the Rebellion: A Compilation of the Official Records of the Union and Confederate Armies, Series I, Volume 45, Part 1 (Serial No. 93), p. 454-6