Showing posts with label Reading. Show all posts
Showing posts with label Reading. Show all posts

Sunday, November 22, 2020

Emory Upton to Maria Upton, February 25, 1857

February 25, 1857.

DEAR SISTER: . . . I am glad to hear of your good health and assiduity to study, and that you are exerting every faculty in the laudable pursuit of education. I am striving equally hard for the same. I am sure that few have the facilities offered for getting an education which I have, and not to take advantage of these privileges is inconsistent. I study from 6 to 7 A. M., and from 8 A. M. to 1 P. M., including recitations; then from 2 to 4 P. M. I read newspapers and write letters; from 4 P. M. till sundown is release from quarters, which I usually spend in the library reading, and then study from 7 to 9.30 P. M.; so that you see my time is pretty well occupied. Perhaps a few of my daily marks would give you an idea of my progress. . . . So long as I can keep up to these marks I am not in danger of being found deficient. . . . I am passionately attached to West Point, and would not give up my appointment here for a million dollars.  I want you to come here next encampment and see the beautiful scenery that I have often tried to describe.

 SOURCE: Peter Smith Michie, The Life and Letters of Emory Upton, p. 12-13

Tuesday, September 22, 2020

Diary of Corporal David L. Day: April 1, 1862


WE LOSE OUR MAJOR.

I learn that Major McCafferty has resigned and is going to leave us. I am sorry to learn that his ambition for fame is so soon gratified. I think a good deal of the major and shall miss him very much. He is a man of great good nature and a good deal of a humorist, and at times he makes considerable sport for the boys. The major's resignation creates a vacancy which, according to military rules will be filled by the ranking captain which is Capt. Pickett of company A. This will change the formation of the line, bringing company B on the left, and ranking second in the line. So, step by step, we ascend the ladder of fame.
[ocr errors]
LIVING HIGH.

. . . . . . . We are now living in clover, having little else to do but to keep ourselves, clothes, arms and equipments clean and in good order. We do a little guard duty and the rest of the time is spent in reading, writing, card-playing and walking about town, seeing the fun and enjoying ourselves. Our rations are of good quality and variety. We now have our fresh beef three times a week, with all the soft bread we want. With our government rations, and what we can buy, such as oysters, fresh fish, chickens, eggs, sweet potatoes, etc., we are running at a high rate of speed. We often contrast this with our life at the inlet.

SOURCE: David L. Day, My Diary of Rambles with the 25th Mass. Volunteer Infantry, p. 52

Thursday, July 16, 2020

Diary of Corporal David L. Day: February 2, 1862

A high wind prevailed this morning and the sea was somewhat rough; the boat had considerable motion, but the boys had their sea legs on, so it caused them very little trouble.

HIGH LIVING.

Our company cooks, with commendable enterprise and industry and with an eye to our present well being, furnished us with baked beans and hot coffee for breakfast. This was a great treat, and every man had all he wanted; a vote of thanks was given the cooks. For dinner boiled beef was served, the first we have had since leaving Fortress Monroe.

I hope this kind of fare will hold out, but fear we shall have a relapse of the worst kind. The chaplain held services in the saloon this morning and afternoon. The boys spent most of the day writing letters, reading newspapers and making up their diaries.

SOURCE: David L. Day, My Diary of Rambles with the 25th Mass. Volunteer Infantry, p. 31

Friday, May 1, 2020

Diary of Corporal David L. Day: January 19, 1862

HATTERAs Isi.AND AND INLET.

Witnessing boat collisions and wrecks is getting old, and the boys are amusing themselves by writing letters, making up their diaries, playing cards, reading old magazines and newspapers which they have read half a dozen times before; and some of them are actually reading their Bibles. Of all the lonely, God-forsaken looking places I ever saw this Hatteras island takes the premium. It is simply a sand-bar rising a little above the water, and the shoals extend nearly 100 miles out to sea. The water is never still and fair weather is never known; storms and sea gulls are the only productions. Sometimes there is a break in the clouds, when the sun can get a shine through for a few moments, but this very rarely happens. The island extends from Cape Henry, Virginia, to Cape Lookout, North Carolina, with occasional holes washed through it, which are called inlets. It is from one-half to two miles wide, and the only things which make any attempt to grow, are a few shrub pines and fishermen. I don’t think there is a bird or any kind of animal, unless it is a dog, on the island, not even a grasshopper, as one would have to prospect the whole island to find a blade of grass, and in the event of his finding one would sing himself to death. The inlet is very narrow, not over half a mile in width, and the channel is still narrower, consequently it makes an indifferent harbor. Still it is better than none, or as the sailors say, any port in a storm. But as bad as it looks and bad as it is, it is, after all, a very important point, perhaps as important in a military point of view as any on the coast. It is the key or gate-way to nearly all of eastern North Carolina, and places us directly in the rear of Norfolk, Va. This island is not without its history, if we may believe all the fearful and marvelous stories that have been written of it, of its being the habitation of wreckers and buccaneers in ye good old colony times.

THEATRICALS.

The boys are up to all sorts of inventions to kill time. In the amusement line the officers have started an exhibition or theatre up in the saloon. It is a clever device to break the dull monotony; to cheer up the loneliness and homesickness which seem to prevail. The exercises consist of recitations, dialogues, singing and music, and make a very good evening's entertainment. A limited number from each company are nightly admitted, and I can see no reason why it will not prove a success, as there seems to be no lack of talent, music or patronage. For a comic performance, one should be down in the after-cabin of an evening, especially about the time the officer of the day, who is a lieutenant, comes around to silence the noise and order the lights out. This after-cabin is a sort of independent community, having its own by-laws, and throwing off pretty much all restraint and doing about as it pleases. The officer of the day is pretty sure to keep out of the cabin during the day, but comes to the head of the stairs in the evening, and gives his orders. Very little attention will be given them, until finally he will venture down stairs, when he will be greeted by an hundred voices with, “Officer of the day! turn out the guard!” And a hundred more will respond, “Never mind the guard!” and this will be kept up until they finally drive him out. Sometimes, after the officer of the day has sailed to restore order, the colonel will come to the stairs and say, “Boys, it is getting late; time to be quiet.” That is the highest known authority, and order will come out of confusion immediately. Without any disparagement to the lieutenants, the boys have a great respect for Col. Upton; he has only to speak and his wishes are cheerfully and instantly complied with.

SOURCE: David L. Day, My Diary of Rambles with the 25th Mass. Volunteer Infantry, p. 23-4

Saturday, April 18, 2020

Diary of Colonel Rutherford B. Hayes: Friday, May 27, 1864

Read Colonel Gilbert's pamphlet on Governor Brough's rule as to promotion. I do not quarrel with it as a general rule, but Colonel Gilbert and the Forty-fourth should have had their officers as desired. To make such a rule inflexible is very foolish.

SOURCE: Charles Richard Williams, editor, Diary and Letters of Rutherford Birchard Hayes, Volume 2, p. 467

Sunday, December 22, 2019

Diary of Captain Luman Harris Tenney: July 7, 1865

Spent the day reading “Eliana” of Lamb's and “Oliver Twist.” Much interested in both. In evening, Mr. McC. and Brown held a meeting near Post Hdqrs. Sang patriotic songs first, then a religious meeting. Several spoke. 1500 present. 800 rose for prayers. Very affecting. Mrs. Searle and other ladies out. Felt much benefited myself.

SOURCE: Frances Andrews Tenney, War Diary Of Luman Harris Tenney, p. 169

Diary of Captain Luman Harris Tenney: July 8, 1865

Read in the morning. Went with Brown to Mrs. Kellogg's to dinner. Belong to Tenney family. Had a good visit. All act and look much like Tenney family. Another large meeting in evening. Great interest manifested. Several spoke.

SOURCE: Frances Andrews Tenney, War Diary Of Luman Harris Tenney, p. 169

Diary of Captain Luman Harris Tenney: July 10, 1865

A cool delightful morning. Was disappointed in not getting my papers. Read in “Oliver Twist.” In evening went to meeting (conference) in open air. Very interesting. God is at work here.

SOURCE: Frances Andrews Tenney, War Diary Of Luman Harris Tenney, p. 169

Diary of Captain Luman Harris Tenney: July 11, 1865

In the morning read “Christian's Mistake” by Miss Muloch. A good story. In P. M. mail. Discharge came. Happy. Went to city. Saw Will Bushnell. Supped with him. Ice cream with 2nd Ohio boys. Like Cousin Sarah Searle so much.

SOURCE: Frances Andrews Tenney, War Diary Of Luman Harris Tenney, p. 169

Friday, December 20, 2019

Diary of 5th Sergeant Osborn H. Oldroyd: May 8, 1863

We were ready to continue our march, but were not ordered out. Some white citizens came into camp to see the "Yankees," as they call us. Of course they do not know the meaning of the term, but apply it to all Union soldiers. They will think there are plenty of Yankees on this road if they watch it. The country here looks desolate. The owners of the plantations are "dun gone," and the fortunes of war have cleared away the fences. One of the boys foraged to-day and brought into camp, in his blanket, a variety of vegetables—and nothing is so palatable to us now as a vegetable meal, for we have been living a little too long on nothing but bacon. Pickles taste first-rate. I always write home for pickles, and I've a lady friend who makes and sends me, when she can, the best kind of "ketchup." There is nothing else I eat that makes me catch up so quick. There is another article we learn to appreciate in camp, and that is newspapers—something fresh to read. The boys frequently bring in reading matter with their forage. Almost anything in print is better than nothing. A novel was brought in to-day, and as soon as it was caught sight of a score or more had engaged in turn the reading of it. It will soon be read to pieces, though handled as carefully as possible, under the circumstances. We can not get reading supplies from home down here. I know papers have been sent to me, but I never got them. The health of our boys is good, and they are brimful of spirits (not "commissary"). We are generally better on the march than in camp, where we are too apt to get lazy, and grumble; but when moving we digest almost anything. When soldiers get bilious, they can not be satisfied until they are set in motion.

SOURCE: Osborn Hamiline Oldroyd, A Soldier's Story of the Siege of Vicksburg, p. 10-11

Friday, December 13, 2019

Diary of Captain Luman Harris Tenney: July 1, 1865

Stayed at home and read most all day. Peck and a friend came down and stayed a few minutes. Ren left yesterday for his sister's in Ill. Hated to have him go. Am uneasy to get away myself.

SOURCE: Frances Andrews Tenney, War Diary Of Luman Harris Tenney, p. 168

Tuesday, December 10, 2019

Diary of Captain Luman Harris Tenney: June 25, 1865

Did not go out to church in A. M. Wrote home and to George. Read in “Capt. Bonneville,” by Irving. Several of the boys called. In evening attended service. Mr. Ives preached. Interesting meeting.

SOURCE: Frances Andrews Tenney, War Diary Of Luman Harris Tenney, p. 168

Diary of Captain Luman Harris Tenney: June 27, 1865

Passed the day in camp. Drew “Stumbling Blocks” and read. In evening went to prayer meeting at chapel. Mustering officer examined our returns. Boys moved down to Marine hospital.

SOURCE: Frances Andrews Tenney, War Diary Of Luman Harris Tenney, p. 168

Diary of Captain Luman Harris Tenney: June 29, 1865

Ren back last night. Cloudy but hot. Wrote home and to Headly. Bosworth and I called on Miss Tripp and Mrs. Searle. Had a very sociable time. Saw Miss Lizzie Daily a few minutes, too. Read “Country Living and Country Thinking” and “Miles O'Reilly.”

SOURCE: Frances Andrews Tenney, War Diary Of Luman Harris Tenney, p. 168

Diary of Captain Luman Harris Tenney: Friday, June 30, 1865

Bosworth left for home. I read paper and books. Drew Longfellow's Poems and Carleton's “Days and Nights on the Battlefield.” Enjoyed reading it. How near Gen. Grant came to losing everything at Fort Donaldson and Shiloh. Played five games of chess with Mrs. Forbes.

SOURCE: Frances Andrews Tenney, War Diary Of Luman Harris Tenney, p. 168

Tuesday, October 29, 2019

Diary of Captain Luman Harris Tenney: June 20, 1865

A very hot day. Read some. Saw Hayes. Time hangs heavily while waiting. Played a good game of ball with Co. “H.” Haven't been so much engaged for years.

SOURCE: Frances Andrews Tenney, War Diary Of Luman Harris Tenney, p. 167

Tuesday, August 20, 2019

Diary of Captain Luman Harris Tenney: June 5, 1865

Another clear and beautiful day. Read “A New Atmosphere.” Game of whist. Passed the Cumberland and Tennessee in the night. The riding in the evening was delightful. Gathered on bow and sung.

SOURCE: Frances Andrews Tenney, War Diary Of Luman Harris Tenney, p. 166

Friday, July 12, 2019

Diary of Captain Luman Harris Tenney: May 19, 1865

Rode a little distance with Major Welch. Told him of the plan talked of. Read in “Skirmishes and Sketches” by Gail Hamilton — much interested. Order for the Grand march in review. Good visit with Traver. Read me some of his leisure notes.

SOURCE: Frances Andrews Tenney, War Diary Of Luman Harris Tenney, p. 164

Friday, May 17, 2019

Diary of Captain Luman Harris Tenney: May 2, 1865

Cloudy in the morning. Went to depot for Minnie Newhall. Spent a part of the day at Minnie's with the girls. The rest of the time at home. Little time to read. Cleveland pictures came.

SOURCE: Frances Andrews Tenney, War Diary Of Luman Harris Tenney, p. 162

Diary of Captain Luman Harris Tenney: May 6, 1865

Newhall friends went yesterday. Has been a very stormy, dreary day. Called at Dr. Steele's. Visited with Aunt Rhodilla and Alonzo. Read some. Got Mrs. Charles' writings. “Cotta Family,” “Early Dawn” and “Kitty Trevellyn's Diary.” Also coarse Testament for mother.

SOURCE: Frances Andrews Tenney, War Diary Of Luman Harris Tenney, p. 162-3