Showing posts with label Inspections. Show all posts
Showing posts with label Inspections. Show all posts

Thursday, October 8, 2020

Diary of 5th Sergeant Osborn H. Oldroyd: Sunday, June 14, 1863

No bells to ring us to church. I wish we had one day in seven for rest and freedom from care; but there is no such thing now for the soldier. It is shoot, shoot, dodge, dodge, from morning to night, without cessation, except when we are asleep. When the time comes, we can lie down and sleep soundly all night, right under our cannon, firing over us all the time, without disturbing us in the least. But let the long roll be sounded—every man is up at the first tap-for that sound we know means business for us. 

Occasionally the rebs plant a mortar in some out of the way spot and drop a shell or two into our midst; but a few well directed shots from our big guns at the rear soon settle them. These rebels obey very well. 

We have several large siege guns, lately planted in the rear of our division, which it took ten yoke of oxen to haul, one at a time, to their places. I had been told that the balls from these guns could be seen on their journey, and could not believe it until I put myself in range of the monsters, just behind them, when I found I could see the balls distinctly, as they flew across the hills towards Vicksburg. These guns are nine-inch calibre and they are about twelve feet long. They are monsters, and their voices are very loud. 

Sunday is general inspection day, and the officers passed through our quarters at 10 A. M., finding our guns and accoutrements bright and clean. If any young lady at the North needs a good housekeeper, she can easily be accommodated by making a requisition on the 20th Ohio. In fact we can all do patchwork, sew on buttons, make beds and sweep; but I do not think many of us will follow the business after the war is done, for the “relief” always so anxiously looked for by the soldiers must then come. 

I heard one of our boys—a high private in the rear rank-lament that he was 

“Only a private, and who will care 
When I shall pass away?” 

Poor lad, he was in a sad way! But it was mere homesickness that ailed him. If dissatisfied with his position as a private, let him wait, for if he survives the war, he will, no doubt, have a chance to be captain of an infantry company. 

SOURCE: Osborn Hamiline Oldroyd, A Soldier's Story of the Siege of Vicksburg, p. 53-4

Sunday, May 31, 2020

Classified Advertisement: Review and Inspection of the British Guard, published April 1, 1862

HEADQUARTERS BRITISH GUARD,                
4th Regt. European Brigade

In accordance with orders from Headquarters, you are ordered to meet at your armory on WEDNESDAY next, 2d April, at 2 P. M., military time, fully armed and equipped, for review and inspection by the Major General

Absentees will be fined according to the Militia Law.

By order of J. J. BURROWES, Captain.
A. F. CAMPBELL, O. S.
mh30-3t

SOURCE: The Times Picayune, New Orleans, Louisiana, Tuesday, April 1, 1862, p. 1

Thursday, December 5, 2019

Diary of Colonel Jacob Ammen, April 5, 1862

Marched 9½ miles over bad roads, and reached Savannah, Tenn., before 12 m. General Grant was not at his headquarters (Savannah), and no one to give orders. General Nelson ordered me to go into camp. The-Tenth Brigade encamped on the southwest side of the town, about half to three-fourths of a mile from the brick house on the river (headquarters). About 3 p. m. General Grant and General Nelson came to my tent. General Grant declined to dismount, as he had an engagement. In answer to my remark that our troops were not fatigued and could march on to Pittsburg Landing, Tenn., if necessary, General Grant said, “You cannot march through the swamps; make the troops comfortable; I will send boats for you Monday or Tuesday, or some time early in the week. There will be no fight at Pittsburg Landing; we will have to go to Corinth, where the rebels are fortified. If they come to attack us, we can whip them, as I have more than twice as many troops as I had at Fort Donelson. Be sure and call at the brick house on the river to-morrow evening, as I have an engagement for this evening.” He and General Nelson then rode off. General Buell arrived about sundown. I called on him at his headquarters, about a quarter of a mile from my tent. The Nineteenth and Twenty-second Brigades encamped near the road before reaching the town. I was not at these camps. As the division is to remain here some days, I issue orders to the Tenth Brigade for review and inspection, to take place Sunday, April 6, 9 a. m.

SOURCE: The War of the Rebellion: A Compilation of the Official Records of the Union and Confederate Armies, Series I, Volume 10, Part 1 (Serial No. 10), p. 330-1

Thursday, August 22, 2019

Diary of Corporal David L. Day: November 16, 1861

Here it is the middle of November, and the weather is most delightful. No frosts, but a warm, mellow atmosphere like our Indian summer in October. It is beautiful, indeed; I am charmed with it. While our farmers in New England are putting up and feeding their cattle in barns, the cattle here are luxuriating in white clover, young, sweet and tender enough to suit the most fastidious taste of any of the cattle on a thousand hills. The farmers about here are harvesting their crops of corn and sweet potatoes, some of which are very fine. Some of the boys brought in some egg plants which grow about here. I never saw any before, but am told they are very good, when properly cooked. I am not disposed to doubt it, never having eaten any of them, but I cannot believe they would make good egg nog.

We begin to see a little something of the peculiar institution, — slavery. There are a great many negroes strolling around the camps, most of them runaways, and as Maryland is supposed to be a loyal state, we have no right to take sides and afford them protection. But we have adopted a kind of English neutrality, although not giving them much protection, we give them whatever information they desire. The masters and hunters are frequently here, looking up their hoys, as they call them, and we generally manage to put them on the wrong track and then run the boys into other camps, and they run them into the woods.

Our regiment was yesterday inspected and reviewed by Brig. Gen. John G. Foster. We put in our best work, and tried to make the best appearance we could. The general seems to be a man who understands his business. At a single glance he takes a man and his equipments all in; looks at his rifle, passes it back and goes for the next one. He complimented Col. Upton on the good drill and appearance of his regiment, and flattered his vanity a little by telling him that with a little more practice his regiment would be as near regulars as it would be possible to bring a volunteer regiment.

SOURCE: David L. Day, My Diary of Rambles with the 25th Mass. Volunteer Infantry, p. 11-2

Thursday, August 1, 2019

Diary of Corporal David L. Day: November 11, 1861

We are now fairly settled in camp life. Several other regiments from Massachusetts and other states are now with us, and drills, inspections and reviews are the order of the day. One can scarcely get time to wash his face, and take, as Gen. Scott said, a hasty plate of soup, before the drum calls to some kind of duty.

SOURCE: David L. Day, My Diary of Rambles with the 25th Mass. Volunteer Infantry, p. 11

Monday, February 4, 2019

Diary of Captain Luman Harris Tenney: March 20, 1865

Relieved by the 2nd N. Y. about noon. Returned to camp near W. House. Drew rations and forage. Inspection of horses. Estimates for clothing, C. and Garrison equipage. A very hot day. Seemed like Petersburg. Read old file of papers. Dreamed of Fannie.

SOURCE: Frances Andrews Tenney, War Diary Of Luman Harris Tenney, p. 148

Friday, January 25, 2019

Diary of Captain Luman Harris Tenney: Saturday, March 11, 1865

Lay in camp all day. Cleaned up. Two inspections. Bathed and changed my clothes. Details went out for forage. Seemed good to get a day's rest. Improved it as well as possible with the work to do.

SOURCE: Frances Andrews Tenney, War Diary Of Luman Harris Tenney, p. 147

Tuesday, December 11, 2018

Diary of Captain Luman Harris Tenney: Friday, February 17, 1865

Class in evening. Good news of Sherman's march. Barnitz returned. Inspection in the morning by Capt. Lawder. The regt. looked splendidly. Talk with Nettleton about home.

SOURCE: Frances Andrews Tenney, War Diary Of Luman Harris Tenney, p. 144

Diary of Captain Luman Harris Tenney: Sunday, February 19, 1865

Battalion inspection in the morning. Had a good bath. Cleaned up grounds. In the evening Capt. Newton came in. Had a good visit. Talked Tenn. experiences. Traver and Barnitz in awhile.

SOURCE: Frances Andrews Tenney, War Diary Of Luman Harris Tenney, p. 144

Tuesday, December 4, 2018

Diary of Captain Luman Harris Tenney: February 12, 1865

Snowing in morning. Blowing all day. Batt. inspection in A. M. Undress parade in P. M. Read sermon in Independent and considerable miscellaneous matter. Wrote home.

SOURCE: Frances Andrews Tenney, War Diary Of Luman Harris Tenney, p. 143

Saturday, October 27, 2018

Diary of Captain Luman Harris Tenney: Friday, January 13, 1865

Drew some extra ordnance. Inspected by Corps Inspector. Complimented by him. Have very neat quarters and neat ground.

SOURCE: Frances Andrews Tenney, War Diary Of Luman Harris Tenney, p. 142

Monday, October 8, 2018

Diary of Captain Luman Harris Tenney: Monday, December 26, 1864

News of the fall of Savannah. Monthly inspection. Detailed for picket.

SOURCE: Frances Andrews Tenney, War Diary Of Luman Harris Tenney, p. 140

Tuesday, August 21, 2018

Diary of 1st Lieutenant Luman Harris Tenney: Sunday, November 27, 1864

Brigade inspection in the morning. Officers and men are becoming pretty thoroughly disgusted with Col. Pennington on account of his mean and inconsistent orders. Wrote home.

SOURCE: Frances Andrews Tenney, War Diary Of Luman Harris Tenney, p. 136

Wednesday, August 1, 2018

Colonel Rutherford B. Hayes to Lucy Webb Hayes: Saturday Afternoon, August 15, 1863

Camp White, August 15 (Saturday afternoon), 1863.

Dearest: — Hottest day yet. All busy trying to keep cool. A dead failure all such attempts. A year ago today we set out for Maryland and east Virginia. A swift year.

You don't write often these days. You don't love me so much as you did. Is that it? Not much! You are as loving as ever, I know, only it is a bore to write. I know that. So it's all right and I am as fond of you as I was when you were only my sweetheart. Yes, more too. Well, write when you can comfortably.

I am going to inspect the Thirteenth at Coal's Mouth tomorrow; take the band along for the fun of it.

I ride about, read novels, newspapers, and military books, and sleep a power. We shall go up to Lewisburg, I guess, in two or three weeks to see after the Rebels in that quarter. All quiet in our borders now. . . . Love to all.

Yours, with great warmth,
R.
Mrs. Hayes.

SOURCE: Charles Richard Williams, editor, Diary and Letters of Rutherford Birchard Hayes, Volume 2, p. 428

Monday, July 30, 2018

Diary of 2nd Lieutenant Luman Harris Tenney: Sunday, November 6, 1864

Inspection of division by Major Otis. Undress parade. Col. Purington took leave of the boys. Given three cheers. Ordered out on two days' scout. Went to forks of road, Cedar Creek and Strasburg over Little North and camped. Acted Adjt. Very laughable scene. A drunken citizen came in, bewildered and lost, almost frozen. He could find a demijohn of brandy if we could only tell him where he laid down.

SOURCE: Frances Andrews Tenney, War Diary Of Luman Harris Tenney, p. 134

Tuesday, January 23, 2018

Diary of 2nd Lieutenant Luman Harris Tenney: January 24, 1864

At Nashville, 9 A. M. quartered at Seminary Barracks. H. Drake and I went to dinner at a restaurant. Saw colored troops drilled and inspected. Went about town. Some splendid residences. Randall quite sick with pleurisy.

SOURCE: Frances Andrews Tenney, War Diary Of Luman Harris Tenney, p. 106

Saturday, January 20, 2018

Diary of 2nd Lieutenant Luman Harris Tenney: January 10, 1864

Packed up and moved to regt. Boys got their things ready to turn over. Hines inspected property.

SOURCE: Frances Andrews Tenney, War Diary Of Luman Harris Tenney, p. 105

Saturday, October 7, 2017

Diary of 2nd Lieutenant Luman Harris Tenney: November 2, 1863

Wrote a letter home. Helped make our ordnance returns —about square in everything. Was kept busy till quite late. Ordered to be ready to march tomorrow at daylight. Plenty of rumors. Col. Kautz came to inspect the cavalry — all wished he would come to stay.

SOURCE: Frances Andrews Tenney, War Diary Of Luman Harris Tenney, p. 96

Diary of 2nd Lieutenant Luman Harris Tenney: November 3, 1863


In the morning went up and saw Provost Marshal about Hayes, also saw him. Fear he will be caused some trouble before getting away. Inspection at 1 P. M. Horses, men and arms. Co. C did itself up in array. Col. P. loaned me “Lillian.” Finished up Quartermaster and clothing, camp and garrison equipage.

SOURCE: Frances Andrews Tenney, War Diary Of Luman Harris Tenney, p. 96

Wednesday, October 4, 2017

Diary of 2nd Lieutenant Luman Harris Tenney: October 30, 1863

Train and sutler came up. Got Co. property. Mail came. Letter from home, expected more. Had inspection and charged boys with ordnance and ordnance stores. Quite a time. Appointed L. H. Thomas Corporal. Busy on muster rolls and Quarterly Returns. Hugh is busy enough. Wrote a letter home. Ordered to march at daylight. Rain poured during night. Uneasy night.

SOURCE: Frances Andrews Tenney, War Diary Of Luman Harris Tenney, p. 95