Who's Who

In alphabetical order by surname:
  • Robert Anderson, Commander of Fort Sumter.
  • John Brown, American abolitionist who believed armed insurrection was the only way to overthrow the institution of slavery in the United States. During the 1856 conflict in Kansas, Brown commanded forces at the Battle of Black Jack and the Battle of Osawatomie.  Brown's followers also killed five slavery supporters at Pottawatomie. In 1859, Brown led an unsuccessful raid on the federal armory at Harpers Ferry that ended with his capture. Brown's trial resulted in his conviction and a sentence of death by hanging
  • James Buchanan, 15th President of the United States.
  • Don Carlos Buell, Major-General in the United States Army, in command of the Army of the Ohio.
  • Simon Cameron, Lincoln's 1st Secretary of War.
  • Salmon P. Chase, Lincoln's Secretary of the Treasury.
  • James Chesnut, Jr., Brigadier General in the Confederate Army.signatory of the Constitution of the Confederate States of America, and previous to the war a United States Senator from South Carolina, but resigned and took part in the South Carolina secession convention.  Husband of Mary Boykin Miller Chesnut.
  • Mary Boykin Miller  Chesnut, Civil War Diarist.  Socialite of Charleston, South Carolina and Richmond, Virginia.  Wife of James Chesnut, Jr.
  • Reverend James Freeman Clarke, American Theologian and Author.
  • George William Curtis, American writer and public speaker.  In 1863 he became the political editor of Harper's Weekly.  Husband of Anne Shaw Curtis who was the sister of Robert Gould Shaw, Colonel of the 54th Massachusetts Infantry.
  • Alexander G. Dowing, Corporal, Co. E, 11th Iowa Infantry.  Civil War Diarist.
  • Wilder Dwight, Lieutenant-Colonel of the 2nd Massachusetts Infantry.  He died September 19, 1862 from wounds at the Battle of Antietam.  Younger brother of Brigadier-General William Dwight.
  • John Murray Forbes, American railroad magnate, merchant, philanthropist and abolitionist
  • Lucy Webb Hayes, First Lady of the United States.  Wife of Rutherford B. Hayes.
  • Rutherford B. Hayes, 19th President of the United States.  Entered the war as a Major in the 23rd Ohio Infantry; by the time the war ended he was a Brevet Major-General.
  • John Beauchamp Jones, Civil War Diarist. He was a popular novelist, literary editor, and political journalist during the mid 19th Century.  During the war he worked as a clerk in the Confederate Department of War.
  • Abraham Lincoln, 16th President of the United States.Husband of Mary Todd Lincoln.
  • Mary Todd Lincoln, First Lady of the United States. Wife of Abraham Lincoln.
  • Charles Russell Lowell, railroad executive, foundryman, and Brigadier-General in the Union Army He was mortally wounded October 19, 1864 at the Battle of Cedar Creek and died the next day.  Husband of Josephine Shaw Lowell.
  • Josephine Shaw Lowell, Civil War Diarist.  Wife of Captain Charles Russell Lowell and Brother of Robert Gould Shaw.
  • Charles H. Lynch, Corporal, 18th Connecticut Infantry.  Civil War Diarist.
  • Theodore Lyman, Aide-de-Camp of Major-General George G. Meade. He later became a United States Congressman representing Massachusetts' 9th District.
  • Judith White Brockenbrough McGuire, Civil War Diarist who wound up as a refugee in Richmond, Virginia during the war.
  • George G. Meade, Major-General in the United States Army.
  • Charles Fessenden Morse, Lieutenant Colonel in the 2nd Massachusetts Infantry. afterward, an influential businessman and civic leader in Kansas City, Missouri.
  • John Lothrop Motley, American historian and diplomat.
  • Charles Eliot Norton, leading American author, social critic, and professor of art. He was a progressive social reformer and a liberal activist whom many of his contemporaries considered the most cultivated man in the United States.
  • Ely S. Parker, Commissioned a Lieutenant Colonel. He served as adjutant to General Ulysses S. Grant. He wrote the final draft of the Confederate surrender terms at Appomattox. Later in his career, Parker rose to the rank of Brevet Brigadier General, one of only two Native Americans to earn a general's rank during the war (the other being Stand Watie, who fought for the Confederacy). President Grant appointed him as Commissioner of Indian Affairs, the first Native American to hold that post.
  • John Aaron Rawlins, served on Grant's staff throughout the war, rising to the rank of brevet major general, and was Grant's chief defender against allegations of insobriety. After the war, he was appointed Secretary of War when Grant was elected President of the United States, but died of advanced tuberculosis five months into his term.
  • William Howard Russell, An Irish Reporter with the London Times.
  • Nassau William Senior, English lawyer known as an economist
  • Robert Gould Shaw, Colonel of the 54th Massachusetts Infantry.  Brother-in-law of George William Curtis, Captain Charles Russell Lowell III, and Brevet Major-General Francis Channing Barlow.  His sister Josephine Shaw Lowell (wife of the above mentioned Charles Russell Lowell) was a Civil War diarist.
  • Edwin M. Stanton, Lincoln's 2nd Secretary of War.
  • Luman Harris Tenney, 2nd Ohio Cavalry
  • Gideon Welles, Lincoln's Secretary of the Navy.

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