Showing posts with label reenlistments. Show all posts
Showing posts with label reenlistments. Show all posts

Sunday, October 11, 2020

Diary of John Beauchamp Jones: February 12, 1864

It is warm to-day, and cloudy; but there was ice early in the morning. We have recaptured twenty-odd of the escaped prisoners. 

A bill has passed Congress placing an embargo on many imported articles; and these articles are rising rapidly in price. Sugar sold to-day at auction in large quantity for $8.00 per pound; rice, 85 cents, etc. 

There is a rumor that Gen. Finnegan has captured the enemy in Florida. 

Gen. Lee says his army is rapidly re-enlisting for the war. 

SOURCE: John Beauchamp Jones, A Rebel War Clerk's Diary at the Confederate States Capital, Volume 2p. 148

Saturday, December 28, 2019

Private Daniel L. Ambrose: July 7, 1861

The regiment's period of enlistment is now drawing to a close, and it has not been out of its native State. The drums are now beating for volunteers to fill up the call made on the fourth of May for three years'troops. The Seventh stood on the banks of the Ohio. They looked southward and they knew that they had not been down there where the wicked enemies of freedom trailed the old flag. They had performed the engagements the government had required of them; but sanguine hearts had been disappointed, and the country was calling again for defenders. The majority of the Seventh say they will stay; that they will re-enlist; that they will harken to every demand the country makes for the defense of her honor and glory. Those re-enlisting are given a short furlough to their homes[.]

SOURCES: Daniel Leib Ambrose, History of the Seventh Regiment Illinois Volunteer Infantry, p. 9-10

Friday, December 20, 2019

Private Daniel L. Ambrose: June 25, 1861

Brig. General Prentiss, and Colonels Oglesby and Paine, visit the camp of the Seventh, addressing the men upon the subject of re-enlisting.

SOURCES: Daniel Leib Ambrose, History of the Seventh Regiment Illinois Volunteer Infantry, p. 8

Wednesday, June 26, 2019

Diary of Colonel Rutherford B. Hayes: December 30, 1863

Eleven years ago married. Lucy and I talked of it and lived it over on this eleventh anniversary. A happy day.

[In the] evening, spoke to the men again about re-enlisting as veterans. I want three-fourths of the present. We have two hundred and fifty-five. Our present total five hundred; of these we deduct officers twenty-five, invalids fifteen, recruits having more than one year to serve seventy-five — total one hundred and fifteen, [leaving] three hundred and eighty-five. Three-fourths [would be] two hundred and eighty-eight.

SOURCE: Charles Richard Williams, editor, Diary and Letters of Rutherford Birchard Hayes, Volume 2, p. 447-8

Monday, June 3, 2019

Colonel Rutherford B. Hayes to Sophia Birchard Hayes, December 3, 1863

Camp White, December 3, 1863.

Dear Mother: — We are all here living very comfortably. Webb and Ruddy are learning lessons daily. Webb is a little backward and hates books. The other little fellow is like Birch and takes to larnin'."

Lucy writes very few letters to anybody and avoids it when she can. She finds a sympathizing friend on this subject in Mrs. Comly, who dislikes it equally. When I am with Lucy, I do the writing.

We are likely to be engaged in pretty active operations here this winter. We are doing all that the weather allows, and have been pretty lucky so far. It will not surprise me if we have some rather severe fighting.

My regiment is re-enlisting daily. There is no doubt that it will be reorganized for three years more before the winter is over. There is a general disposition with officers and men to see the end of the war in the field, if our lives and health are spared. Your letter mailed 30th came last night. Quick time! — My love to all.

Affectionately, your son,
R.
Mrs. Sophia Hayes.

SOURCE: Charles Richard Williams, editor, Diary and Letters of Rutherford Birchard Hayes, Volume 2, p. 446

Thursday, April 25, 2019

Diary of Colonel Rutherford B. Hayes: December 3, 1863

The recent victory of Grant near Chattanooga seems to be very complete. We have not heard from Burnside, besieged in Knoxville by Longstreet, since the 24th or 25th. We have some apprehensions, but hope that he has been relieved by Grant's success. Meade has pushed into the heart of eastern Virginia after Lee. I fear the result. The Army of the Potomac has been as unlucky on Virginia soil as the army of Lee on our soil.

Company B left today for home, over three-fourths, fifty-four, having enlisted as veteran volunteers. Companies A, E, and F are likely to follow suit.

SOURCE: Charles Richard Williams, editor, Diary and Letters of Rutherford Birchard Hayes, Volume 2, p. 445-6

Wednesday, November 28, 2018

Diary of Colonel Rutherford B. Hayes: September 30, 1863

Today I explained to the Twenty-third Order Number 191 respecting the re-enlistment of veteran volunteers. I told them I would not urge them to re-enlist; that my opinion was that the war would end soon after the inauguration of a new President or of Lincoln for a second term, say within one year after the expiration of their present term, i. e., June 1865, unless foreign nations intervened, in which case they would all expect to fight again. About sixty re-enlisted.

SOURCE: Charles Richard Williams, editor, Diary and Letters of Rutherford Birchard Hayes, Volume 2, p. 437

Tuesday, November 13, 2018

Colonel Rutherford B. Hayes to Sophia Birchard Hayes, September 28, 1863

Today I explained to the Twenty-third Order Number 191 respecting the re-enlistment of veteran volunteers. I told them I would not urge them to re-enlist; that my opinion was that the war would end soon after the inauguration of a new President or of Lincoln for a second term, say within one year after the expiration of their present term, i. e., June 1865, unless foreign nations intervened, in which case they would all expect to fight again. About sixty re-enlisted.

SOURCE: Charles Richard Williams, editor, Diary and Letters of Rutherford Birchard Hayes, Volume 2, p. 437

Monday, October 29, 2018

Diary of Gideon Welles: Thursday, March 24, 1864

Tom and Admiral Dahlgren returned from Fortress Monroe, but without the remains of young Dahlgren.

We are running short of sailors and I have no immediate remedy. The army officers are not disposed to lose good men, and seem indifferent to the country and general welfare if their service can get along. Commodore Rowan writes that the times of the men are running out and no reenlistments; the army is paying enormous bounties. Between thirty and forty vessels are waiting crews.

SOURCE: Gideon Welles, Diary of Gideon Welles, Secretary of the Navy Under Lincoln and Johnson, Vol. 1: 1861 – March 30, 1864, p. 545-6

Tuesday, May 1, 2018

Diary of 2nd Lieutenant Luman Harris Tenney: July 10, 1864

Took the inspected horses to Quartermaster Stone and turned them in — 79 to be receipted for by Lt. Spangler. Had a good bath. Read several articles in the Atlantic. My eyes are occasioning me considerable trouble. Have thought of home a good deal today. Many of the officers are thinking of going home when their three years' term expires. Of course it would be pleasant to go home as soon as possible, but many officers promised their men that they would remain with them. I don't know what I shall do. I could not go to Oberlin to stay and I have no desire to go elsewhere and I think for the present every man able should bear arms.

SOURCE: Frances Andrews Tenney, War Diary Of Luman Harris Tenney, p. 124

Sunday, January 21, 2018

Diary of 2nd Lieutenant Luman Harris Tenney: January 13, 1864

Rations of flour. Up early. Many officers at Chamberlain's. Off on the cars at 9:30. Gen. Foster on board — don't like his style. Loudon at 2 p. M. Went to barracks. (30 days' “veteran furlough” for those of the 2nd O. V. C. who re-enlisted.)

SOURCE: Frances Andrews Tenney, War Diary Of Luman Harris Tenney, p. 105

Thursday, January 18, 2018

Diary of 2nd Lieutenant Luman Harris Tenney: January 1, 1864

1st. Happy New Year! Gay and festive. Frozen and just starving. Re-enlistment question presented to the boys. Three from the 2nd Ohio. Took dinner at hdqrs., at white house. Cabbage and beef and mutton. Had a chat with the people. All have suffered badly. Even underclothes taken during the late fights by rebs, also wheat and corn. First-rate visit with Col. Garrard and Allen. Review of campaign. Hard bread, flour and pork for the boys. Makes me happy. Don't ask more satisfaction than to get plenty of rations. Have been half crazy with anxiety for days.

First command in line east of Mossy Creek. Rained last night. Turned cold about 12 P. M. and blew a hurricane. Awful tedious day. Boys must suffer very much. Col. and staff up and around fires early.

SOURCE: Frances Andrews Tenney, War Diary Of Luman Harris Tenney, p. 104

Diary of 2nd Lieutenant Luman Harris Tenney: January 4, 1864

Enlistment question all the go. Maj. Nettleton gone to Knoxville with proposition and application.

SOURCE: Frances Andrews Tenney, War Diary Of Luman Harris Tenney, p. 104

Diary of 2nd Lieutenant Luman Harris Tenney: January 5, 1864

Last day for re-enlistment. Most of the boys in favor. N. telegraphs that proposition has been accepted and regt. will be ordered home within fifteen days. Boys all excitement.

SOURCE: Frances Andrews Tenney, War Diary Of Luman Harris Tenney, p. 104

Saturday, October 7, 2017

Diary of 2nd Lieutenant Luman Harris Tenney: November 4, 1863

Aroused before daylight. Struck tents and loaded wagons. About 8 A. M. again pitched tents and sent out forage detail. Voted on re-enlistment question. Co. C, 21. Well done for it. Felt proud, better than most companies. Had good visit with many of the boys. Finished "Lillian." Thede got some apples. Pleasant day.

SOURCE: Frances Andrews Tenney, War Diary Of Luman Harris Tenney, p. 96

Wednesday, October 4, 2017

Diary of 2nd Lieutenant Luman Harris Tenney: October 26, 1863

Got out desk and Co. property to work. Trains reloaded and sent to the rear. Fear of an attack. Proposed to the boys the order for re-enlistment. Read some in “B. House.” Boys got some good apples and apple butter. Cloudy and quite cold. Contradictory news from the Army of the Potomac. Election news.

SOURCE: Frances Andrews Tenney, War Diary Of Luman Harris Tenney, p. 95

Friday, September 22, 2017

Diary of 2nd Lieutenant Luman Harris Tenney: October 25, 1863

Morning work over, set out for regt. Stopped in town and saw wounded boys. Glad to see the boys so long absent. Reached Watauga about noon. Found most of Co. C absent on a scout. Came in about dark. Grand jubilee. Proposed to re-enlist as regiment. All would like to go home this winter but some don't want to be bound again till time's out.

SOURCE: Frances Andrews Tenney, War Diary Of Luman Harris Tenney, p. 94-5

Wednesday, August 9, 2017

Diary of Sergeant Major Luman Harris Tenney: July 2, 1863

Borrowed one day's rations of the 12th R. I. Expecting a train for ourselves. Boys very accommodating. Regt. to be mustered out of service on the 13th. All very happy. It makes me almost homesick and still I am glad my time is not out. I could not be satisfied at home with this cruel war going on. Many will re-enlist. Boys went for forage.

SOURCE: Frances Andrews Tenney, War Diary Of Luman Harris Tenney, p. 77

Thursday, April 13, 2017

Diary of Private Charles Wright Wills: July 27, 1861


Cairo.  We number now about 60 and have 25 days in which to fill up to 100. Two hundred and fifty of our regiment of three-months’ men have re-enlisted. Two hundred and fifty out of 680, which is considerably better than any eastern regiment that I have seen mentioned. There was not a sick man in our company when we returned, and there is not now. One of the boys just tells me that day before yesterday morning there were but eight in the regiment hospital. Three men from our regiment have died in three and a half months. One of these I know killed himself with imprudence. I have telegraphed to the boys to be in Peoria Wednesday. I have not the least idea that any of them will back out. It does seem real good to be back here again where a fellow can swing himself and lay around loose with sleeves up, collar open, (or shirt off if it suits him better) hair unkempt, face unwashed and everything un-anything. It beats clerking ever so much! We were paid off yesterday. The privates received $56.72 each in gold, silver and copper, which is $24.00 more than we expected.

We are having some more excitement in camp to-day. A rumored attack in prospect on Bird's Point is the subject. We are putting the recruits through in two-forty-style to get them ready. Twenty rounds of cartridges were served to us at noon to-day, and Prentiss’ aids are galloping round as if tight. About one quarter of the recruits have their accoutrements on, and some of them scoot up on the levee every ten minutes to look at the Point. We have all kinds of rumors of from 2,000 to 15,000 Rebels within from 6 to 15 miles of us, but if 20 preachers would swear to the truth, there's not one man that has been here three months would believe it. Been fooled too often! Our officers are careful though, and treat every thing from head-quarters as reliable till the contrary is proven.

It is a horrid trip from Peoria to Cairo as the trains run now. We laid over three hours in El Paso, and eleven hours in Centralia; from 11 p. m. till 10 a. m. Awful! and rode down from Centralia in an accommodation freight. The bed was excellent at home, but I think that sleeping on boards rests me better and I know I sleep sounder.

Have worked two hours hard at cleaning up quarters and eating supper since my last period. Supper consisted of coffee, bread and butter, and cold steak pickled in vinegar. Vinegar is a great improvement on cold beef, I wonder you never adopted it. We have a prime lot of boys this time. There are not ten out of the whole company that I would not like to have for associates at home. I don't believe that one of them will ever take quarters in the guard-house.

I think our company will be full in ten days. We have refused lots of roughs here in camp also in Peoria, but three or four little ones have crept in through acquaintances' influence. Those men we have will learn to drill in half less time than any other lot of recruits on the ground, because they have a pride in their appearance and dress, and that has given them a better carriage and command of themselves than rougher customers have.

We will have in a few days nothing but new recruits here except the fractions of regiments that have re-enlisted; the 10th, which calls itself the crack regiment of the post, will all leave for home day after to-morrow. If it does not come back full in 30 days it will be disbanded. This is Prentiss' old regiment.

SOURCE: Charles Wright Wills, Army Life of an Illinois Soldier, p. 20-2

Tuesday, July 12, 2016

Diary of Sergeant George G. Smith: July 29, 1862

Re-enlisted in the 1st Louisiana Regiment as Orderly Sergeant of Company E. The regimental officers were Colonel Richard E. Holcomb, formerly Major of the 13th C. V., Lieutenant Colonel Henry H. Elliot, Major William O. Fisk, and Adjutant Charles H. Grosvenor, formerly sergeant of Company H, 13th C. V. The line officers of Company E were, Captain Louis A. Solomon, 1st Lieutenant Rudolph Krause, Second Lieutenant James M. Gardner, formerly 2d Sergeant Co. K, 13th C. V.

SOURCE: George G. Smith, Leaves from a Soldier's Diary, p. 25